Democrats Booker, Klobuchar Do Not Give Trump Any Credit for Strong Economy

By Susan Jones | May 6, 2019 | 5:11 AM EDT

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) (Photo: Screen capture)

(CNSNews.com) - Appearing separately on CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday, Democrats Cory Booker and Amy Klobuchar -- both running for president -- refused to give President Donald Trump credit for the strong U.S. economy and labor market.

"I give our workers and our businesses the credit," Klobuchar told host Jake Tapper.

"I love that Trump is taking credit for a recovery that started under Obama," Booker told Tapper.

In his interview with Klobuchar, Tapper pointed to the latest numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics: "The economy added more than a quarter-million jobs, better than economists expected. Unemployment is at its lowest level in almost 50 years. Wages grew faster than prices did. Do you give President Trump the credit?" Tapper asked the senator from Minnesota:

 

"I give our workers and our businesses the credit, Jake," Klobuchar replied:

When you're out there across the country, you see people working harder and harder every day. And this has meant that we are -- our businesses are strong, and we're selling American goods.

That being said, a lot of people aren't sharing in this prosperity because of the costs, the cost of college, the cost of health care, the fact that the president had promised that he would bring down the prices of their prescription drugs, and that just hasn't happened.

So, when you get out there and you see the energy out there and the concern, talk to farmers who are trying to sell their soybeans. There are people out there that are not sharing in this economic prosperity. And it's not fair. And it's not the American way.

So, while we attribute a lot of this to our workers and to our businesses, we know we can do better as a country.

Tapper noted that the unemployment rate hit a 49-year low of 3.6 percent as of May 3: "You're really not going to give President Trump any credit for that in terms of his tax cuts or deregulation or anything he's done?" he asked.

Klobuchar credited President Barack Obama with getting the U.S. "on the road to recovery."

"So, I think that we have had policies in place, starting with President Obama, that have aided that recovery."

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

‘Walk around my block’

In his interview with Sen. Booker, Tapper asked: "How do you make a pitch to voters -- the economy's thriving, let's get rid of the president?"

"You don't need to make a pitch. Listen to voters," Booker replied:

When you walk around my block, you ask people if the numbers that Donald Trump touts are really making a difference in their lives. You have people on my block -- I'm the only presidential candidate that lives in a low-income inner-city neighborhood.

Talk to folks, and they'll tell you: "I have to work two jobs just to try to keep myself in housing. And, by the way, that housing isn't reflected in any of my family."

Americans are struggling. Their wages are too low, are decades low -- for the last four decades, I don't think they've budged that much.

Tapper noted that wages have gone up 3 percent, more than they rose on Obama's watch.

"First of all, Obama -- I love that Trump is taking credit for a recovery that started under Obama," the senator from New Jersey replied.

"But the substance of this -- who is this economy going to work for? And we had a tax plan that was all about giving the wealthiest people more -- more of a break.

"My vision for this country is that we will target things like a massive increase in the Earned Income Tax Credit to actual workers. We've got to make sure that this is a shared recovery, because, right now, it definitely is not."

Booker is running on a platform of "uniting Americans."

"And this is a moment where, across this country, from farm towns to factory towns, from cities to suburbs, we have so much common pain, where Americans are seeing, from the cost of prescription drugs, the cost of college, that we are all hurting because we have not designed an economy that invests in each other," Booker said.

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