Starbucks' First LGBT Ad Features Drag Queens

By Penny Starr | November 10, 2014 | 12:55 PM EST

A drag queen gestures during the Euro Pride gay parade in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday, July 17, 2010. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

(CNSNews.com) – Starbucks is putting its support for the gay lifestyle into its marketing campaign with the release of an ad featuring drag queens.

“Well, here's one place we certainly didn't think we'd see the ‘RuPaul's Drag Race Girls’ pop up,” James Nichols wrote in an article for the Huffington Post’s Gay Voices section.

The ad features two men dressed as women who were featured in Season Six of the television series “Drag Race,” Adore Delano and Bianca Del Rio.

The “girls” in the video are fighting in line over who gets served first, but in the end the Starbucks server gives them both their order at the same time.

“Saving friendships since 1971,” the video concluded. “Expect more than great coffee.”

“Starbucks has long been an ally to the queer community,” Nichols wrote in his piece accompanying the one-minute ad.

“Not only did the organization raise a Pride Flag over its Seattle headquarters earlier this year, but the company's CEO famously told an anti-gay shareholder that he was free to ‘sell [his] shares of Starbucks and buy shares in another company’ if he had a problem with the company's pro-gay values,” Nichols wrote.

A photo of that “Pride Flag” is featured on the Starbuck’s Pride Alliance Network’s Facebook page, which also has a link to the ad with the status: “We'll be Coffee Frenemies with you Bianca and Adore!”

In a 2013 article, CNN Money reported on Starbucks’ support for repealing the Defense of Marriage.

“Starbucks has long been a supporter of same-sex marriage,” the article stated.

“In 2011, the company was among a group of 70 businesses and organizations that filed a brief in federal court opposing the Defense of Marriage Act, which restricts the definition of marriage to that between a man and a woman,” the CNN article stated.


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