Pro-Life Advocate: Eugenics Still Practiced Today Through Genetic Screenings and IVF

By Penny Starr | September 1, 2016 | 8:27 PM EDT

Arina Grossu, director of the Center for Human Dignity at the Family Research Center, gave a lecture on modern-day eugenics on Aug. 31, 2016 in Washington, D.C. (CNSNews.com/Penny Starr)

(CNSNews.com) – Although many people think of eugenics as a bygone ideology once embraced by the likes of Adolph Hitler, the Rockefeller Foundation and Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, efforts to perfect the human race are still practiced today through modern technology that allows for pre-natal screenings and genetic testing, according to Arina Grossu, director of the Center for Human Dignity at the Family Research Council.

Efforts to perfect the human race are still practiced today through modern technology that allows for pre-natal screenings and genetic testing, according to Arina Grossu, director of the Center for Human Dignity at the Family Research Council.

“The question to keep in mind is ... to what end are we doing this screening?” Grossu asked during a lecture at the pro-family, pro-life organization’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday.

"Is it to heal or is it to kill and destroy?” Grossu said.

FRC referred to this pursuit of “biological perfection” as “transhumanism” that dates back to the 1920s in the United States when it became mainstream to support efforts to rid the population of those who were “unfit” of “feeble-minded" through sterilization.

"Modern eugenics has a similar underlying philosophy as its predecessor, manifesting itself differently through prenatal and genetic screening with the aim to abort a child with adverse conditions, sex-selective abortions, in-vitro selection, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), aborting extra embryos via ‘selective reduction,’ three-parent embryo technologies, genetic engineering, and gene editing,” the announcement of the lecture stated.

“Transhumanism claims to have as its goal the transformation of the human condition, but at what cost given its commonalities with eugenics?” it stated.

 

 

Grossu said that in 2007 the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommended that all pregnant women should receive fetal chromosomal screening in the first trimester. The number of diseases that can be screened for has gone from about 100 in 1993 to 4,500 today, Grossu said.

And when screenings result in a diagnosis of a disease or disability, the end result is often abortion, Grossu said.

“So science and technology are good, except when they kill human beings or compromise human dignity,” she said.

Grossu cited in vitro fertilization (IVF), where embryos are selected based on their “grade” by technicians. She cited Reproductive Partners in California, which states on its website its efforts to that end:

“Our goal is for you to deliver a single healthy baby. Multiple pregnancies, e.g. twins, triplets or more are associated with an increased risk of prematurity when compared to singleton pregnancies.”

“In some cases we can reduce the total number of embryos we transfer by allowing the embryos to develop longer in the lab prior to transfer. Blastocyst transfer also allows the option of Elective Single Embryo Transfer.”

“Many couples are using Preimplantation Genetic Screening for chromosome to insure that the embryos being transferred are chromosomally normal.”

“Do we kill a class of children because of their special needs?” Grossu said. The answer, she said, is, unfortunately “yes.”

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