Santorum: ‘Separation of Church and State' Was in Soviet Constitution Not U.S. Constitution

By Michael W. Chapman | December 18, 2014 | 3:15 PM EST

(CNSNews.com) -- In response to a question about how the agenda of the “far left” in America mirrors that as detailed in The Communist Manifesto, former Senator Rick Santorum (R-Penn.) said it is worth noting that the words “separation of church and state” do not appear in the U.S. Constitution but are cited in the constitution of the former Communist Soviet Union.

“The word ‘separation of church and state’ is not in the U.S. Constitution, but it was in the constitution of the former Soviet Union. That’s where it very, very comfortably sat, not in ours,” said Sen. Santorum during a coalition telephone call sponsored by STAND and posted on Dec. 1.

STAND, Staying True to America’s National Destiny, headed by Rev. E.W. Jackson in Chesapeake, Va., is a conservative organization that seeks “to bring people together around the foundational principles that made America great,” reads its website.

Each week, STAND holds a National Emergency Coalition Call on issues it views are of upmost importance to the nation.

During the call with Senator Santorum, a man called in and said,  “This is William in Chesapeake, just two observations or a question and observation. One is an observation that if you’ve ever read The Communist Manifesto, that a number of the things that the far left, a.k.a. the Democrat Party, and the president is pushing for and accomplishing actually accomplishes a number of the tenets of  The Communist Manifesto,  including the amnesty, the elevation of pornography, homosexuality, gay marriage, voter fraud, open borders, mass self-importation of illegal immigrants and things of that nature. I think that’s a huge cause for concern that would raise a number of red flags for any politician.”

Communists Vladimir Lenin, left, and Joseph Stalin, the first and second dictators that ruled the USSR for its first 36 years of existence.

At that point, Santorum interjected and made his comment about the “separation of church and state,” a phrase that is not in the U.S. Constitution or the Declaration of Independence.

In Article 13 of the general provisions of the constitution of the USSR, adopted in July 1918, it states, “In order to ensure genuine freedom of conscience for the working people, the church is separated from the State, and the school from the church: and freedom of religious and anti-religious propaganda is recognized for all citizens.”

Despite the latter claim about “freedom of religious propaganda … for all citizens,” the Soviet Union founded by Vladimir Lenin and the Bolsheviks pursued progressively strict and violent policies against all religions.

Details about the religious persecution in the Soviet Union are well-documented in the book, Russia Under the Bolshevik Regime, by Richard Pipes, now Baird Professor Emeritus of History at Harvard University.


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Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman