Iraq 2018: Rape Charges Dropped, If Rapist Marries His Victim

By Michael W. Chapman | May 17, 2018 | 3:23 PM EDT

An Iraqi woman. (YouTube)

(CNSNews.com) -- Although Iraq is a constitutional parliamentary republic today, thanks largely to the U.S. forces that overthrew Saddam Hussein and implemented the new government, the country is still dealing with civil strife and terrorism and, as the U.S. State Department's Human Rights Report on Iraq documents, the situation for women in Iraq is dismal.

For instance, there are no laws to protect women against domestic violence in Iraq; female genital mutiliation/cutting persists; and honor killings "remained a serious problem throughout the country," reported the U.S. State Department. In addition, "women and girls were at times sexually exploited through so-called temporary marriages," which is permitted under Islam.

According to iCasualties, 4,541 American soldiers have died in Iraq since the United States invaded in 2003, some 15 years ago. Below are some of the highlights from the Human Rights Report 2017 on Iraq in regard to women:

(YouTube)

"The law permitted honor as a lawful defense in violence against women, and honor killings remained a serious problem throughout the country. Some families arranged honor killings to appear as suicides." (Emphasis added.)

If a man is convicted of murdering his wife or a female dependent because he suspected her of committing adultery, then the man can only go to prison for a maximum of three years.

"The law criminalizes rape (but not spousal rape)…. The law allows authorities to drop a rape case if the perpetrator marries the victim." (Emphasis added.)

(YouTube)

The United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) "reported that several hundred women died each year from honor killings."

"Women and girls were at times sexually exploited through so-called temporary marriages, under which a man gives the family of the girl or woman dowry money in exchange for permission to 'marry' her for a specified period."

"Government officials and international and local NGOs also reported that the traditional practice of 'fasliya'--whereby family members, including women and children, are traded to settle tribal disputes--remained a problem, particularly in southern governorates." (Emphasis added.)

"Employers subjected women to involuntary domestic service through forced marriages and the threat of divorce, and women who fled such marriages or whose husbands divorced them were vulnerable to further forced labor."

(YouTube)

"There were reports that ISIS forced Yezidi women whom they had impregnated to have abortions."

"Although the constitution forbids discrimination based on gender, conservative societal standards impeded women’s ability to enjoy the same legal status and rights as men in all aspects of the judicial system."

"Law and custom generally do not respect freedom of movement for women. For example, the law prevents a woman from applying for a passport without the consent of her male guardian or a legal representative." (Emphasis added.)

"Women could not obtain the Civil Status Identification Document--required for access to public services, food assistance, health care, employment, education, and housing--without the consent of a male relative." (Emphasis added.)

(YouTube)

"According to UNICEF in 2016, approximately 975,000 women and girls had been married before age 15, twice as many as in 1990. Early and forced marriages, as well as abusive temporary marriages, occurred in rural and urban areas."

(YouTube)

"Thousands of women, particularly those from ethnic and religious communities that ISIS considered as not conforming to their doctrine of Islam, were raped, sexually enslaved, murdered, and endured other forms of physical and sexual violence." (Emphasis added.)

"During the year ISIS kidnapped women and girls to sell, rent, or gift them as forced 'brides' (a euphemism for forced marriage or sexual slavery) to ISIS fighters and commanders, and exploited the promise of sexual access in propaganda materials as part of its recruitment strategy." (Emphasis added.)

Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman

Sponsored Links