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VP Biden: America Is ‘Asking All the Wrong Questions’

Michael Morris
By Michael Morris | September 18, 2014 | 4:40 PM EDT

Vice President Joe Biden, while delivering a speech at the Iowa State Capitol during a “Nuns on the Bus” campaign rally, suggested that the country has been asking the “wrong questions” for the last eight to 10 years.

But just what have we been asking, and what makes the questions that have been asked the wrong questions?

Biden said the following regarding the questions that have been asked:

“We’ve been asking: Are corporations overtaxed? Are you kidding me? No, but seriously, what’s the debate? Are corporations overtaxed? In Ireland they tax this and that.

“The second question that’s asked: Is Wall Street overregulated? That’s what we’re debating. Is it overregulated?

“Are unions too powerful?

“No I’m serious. Think of the debate that we’re engaged in. We’re asking all the wrong questions.”

Biden then declared that “it’s time to stand up and ask the right questions – because that’s the only way there’s a shot at getting the right answers.”

With the U.S. having the highest corporate income tax rate in the developed world in 2013, what makes asking whether corporations are overtaxed the wrong question; with the passage of Dodd-Frank, why is it wrong to ask whether Wall Street is overregulated; and with teacher unions like the NEA and AFT tying the hands of their dues-paying members, why can’t Americans ask whether unions are too powerful? These aren't important questions?

But Biden does not stop at pointing out what he thinks are the wrong questions. He also tells us what the right questions are:

“The question is: is, is this, uh, this thing that they call inversion – meaning that American corporations, that have been nurtured and built here in the United States, had the protection of the law enforcement and the government, had the tax breaks, had the infrastructure, the highways built to accommodate them – all those things, is it appropriate that they can now pick up and move their headquarters to another country to get in a lower tax rate.

"Can any of you do that? That’s the question we should be asking. Is that appropriate?”

Is "that" the question Joe?

Aren’t corporations, in a nation founded upon liberty, allowed to move whenever and wherever they please? Is that not what freedom allows Americans to do?

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