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Levin: McConnell Completely Contradicts Himself on Repealing Obamacare

Michael Morris
By Michael Morris | November 3, 2014 | 11:54 AM EST

Senator Mitch McConnell, having promised to repeal Obamacare back in 2012, recently walked back that statement, suggesting that he will leave the daunting and suffocating health care overhaul (the Affordable Care Act) intact, and Mark Levin is having none of it.

He (Mitch McConnell) was interviewed by my good friend Neil Cavuto yesterday, and, uhh, he did everything he could not to say anything. So, Neil Cavuto says to him, “What about repealing Obamacare?” Cut seven go:

Neil Cavuto: "I’m sorry sir but it sounds like what you’re saying, that repealing the medical device tax might be the more doable of those options when it comes to the Affordable Care Act, the whole, dismantling of it, likely, unlikely."

Mitch McConnell: "Well, it would take 60 votes in the senate. No one thinks we’re going to have 60 Republicans, and it would take a president, presidential signature. No one thinks we’re going to get that. So the question is: What can you do about it? I’d like to put the senate Democrats in the position of voting on the most unpopular parts of this law and see if we can put it on the president’s desk."

Now notice, not a word about the best interest of the American people that Obamacare is killing the private insurance business. It’s killing private insurance policies. It’s driving up your deductible. No. It’s all politics. You see, I want to cherry-pick – pick and choose those parts of Obamacare that I think are unpopular – vote on it, pass it, put those on the president’s desk, even though we know he won’t sign those, so he can get some political, you know, issue out of this for 2016.

And some of you are bobbing your heads up and down. That’s right. That’s right. That’s right. You know, a few years ago I had a man on this program by the name of Congressman Paul Ryan, and I asked Congressman Paul Ryan, “Why can’t you guys repeal Obamacare the way Obamacare was passed?” It was passed, ladies and gentlemen, it was passed as a budget bill or part of a tax bill, I should say, which requires 51 votes, not 60, and at the time, Paul Ryan said to me, “85 to 90 percent of that bill can, in fact, be repealed that way.” So it doesn’t take 60 Republican Senators to vote and actually, legislatively, put on the president’s desk a repeal of 85 to 95 percent of Obamacare, whether he signs it or not. It takes 51!

And Paul Ryan wasn’t the only one who said it. Two and a half years ago, Mitch McConnell said it. Cut six go:

"Yes, the Chief Justice said it’s a tax, and taxes are clearly what we call reconcilable. That’s the kind of measure that can be pursued with 51 votes in the Senate, and if I’m the leader of the majority next year, I commit to the American people that the repeal of Obamacare will be job one."

Did you hear that folks? Yes. This is a program that is based on integrity, integrity of the process. I’m not going to sit here and just bash Democrats and bash Obama, although, I could, and for damn good reason. But all of these people have to be held to account.

Mitch McConnell, yesterday, told Neil Cavuto the opposite. It takes 60 Republicans in the Senate to repeal Obamacare. Two and a half years ago, on Fox News Sunday, on the very same cable network, he said they can do it with 51 votes.

I, again, am going to play you what he said on Neil Cavuto yesterday and then play for you what he said two and a half years ago, and I want to know, is anyone going to hold this man to account, because it is clear he has no intention of using 51 votes of the Republican new majority, if they get it, to repeal Obamacare. All of you people, who are losing your doctors, who are losing your healthcare, your deductible is going through the roof, and all of you people who haven’t felt it yet, but you will, I just want you to understand that it is a Republican who appointed John Roberts, who voted for Obamacare, that it is a Republican Congress, in the next Congress, should the Senate turn Republican, that refuses to repeal it. And if Mitch McConnell can say, we want to put the worst aspects of this bill on the president’s desk for political reasons, why doesn’t he put the whole damn thing on his desk, for political reasons? And the nation would support him. Again, Cavuto’s show, Mitch McConnell, yesterday, cut seven go:

Neil Cavuto: "I’m sorry sir but it sounds like what you’re saying, that repealing the medical device tax might be the more doable of those options when it comes to the Affordable Care Act, the whole dismantling of it, likely, unlikely."

Mitch McConnell: "Well, it would take 60 votes in the senate. No one thinks we’re going to have 60 Republicans, and it would take a president, presidential signature. No one thinks we’re going to get that. So the question is: What can you do about it? I’d like to put the senate Democrats in the position of voting on the most unpopular parts of this law and see if we can put it on the president’s desk."

So, what the hell does that get us folks? They said, that idiot Kevin McCarthy, the number two Republican in the House, they want to show they can govern. Is this how they’re going to show they can govern? Mickey Mouse, Mickey Mouse crap to deceive you. And here’s what he said July 1, 2012, two and a half years ago on Fox News Sunday. Cut six, go:

Yeah but, the Chief Justice said it’s a tax. Taxes are clearly what we call reconcilable. That’s the kind of measure that can be pursued with 51 votes in the Senate, and if I’m the leader of the majority next year, I commit to the American people that the repeal of Obamacare will be job one.

“If I’m the leader of the majority next year, I commit to the American people that the repeal of Obamacare will be job one.” A commitment from Mitch McConnell means nothing. It means nothing. We’ve gone from, it would take 60 votes, so he’s intentionally raising the bar required to do what he said would take 51 votes. He said it two and a half years ago. He said, “If I become the majority leader, repealing Obamacare will be job one.” Now he says, “We’ll throw a few cherry-picked items at the president that are unpopular for political reasons, but it takes 60 votes in the senate.” It does not take 60 votes in the senate! It takes 51!

The way it was passed, Obam-uh, the Supreme Court said it’s a tax bill. The senate has a process in place under reconciliation, where you can’t filibuster it with 60 votes. It’s 51. So, he talks tough when they’re in the minority. “51 votes, we’ll repeal this damn thing.” And he had to know back then, when he said it, that Obama was still President of the United States, or would be, or might be. And now, because they feel they’ve got this thing all wrapped up, a wave election, maybe not a wave election, whatever kind of election, now suddenly, it takes 60 votes.

There’s a reason why you’re cynical. There’s a reason why you’re frustrated. There’s a reason why you’re disgusted, and I’m with you. If I had just told you what the man had said, it wouldn’t have registered as much as hearing what the man has said. I mean, how can you say, on the one hand, yesterday, it takes 60 votes, and on the other hand, two and a half years ago, it takes 51 votes. Well you can’t. Not while I’m here.

…but you’re never going to hold this guy to account. He’ll be in office another six years. He’ll be more arrogant than ever before. He’ll think that he defeated conservatives and the Tea Party. He got a number of his buddies elected. They’re going to be worse than before. They’re going to be awful. And Obama is going to be worse than before. He’s going to be awful. And Kevin McCarthy, the number two Republican in the House, is going to look for ways to get bipartisan support, to do what? To unravel the federal leviathan? To cut spending? To have real tax reform? To secure the border? No!

Here’s the problem. I explained it the other day. The trend, the trajectory, is in only one direction. When they talk about bipartisanship, it moves us to the left, more gradually than it might otherwise, but it moves us to the left. It’s never bipartisanship for federalism. It’s never bipartisanship for tax reform, a flat tax or a fair tax. The conservative agenda is never front and center. It’s never the subject of debate. It’s never the subject of elections. It’s never the subject of votes, even by Republicans.

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