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Sen. Paul: Ex-CIA Dir. Brennan Voted for the Communist Party, and Yet Called Trump Treasonous

Michael W. Chapman
By Michael W. Chapman | July 19, 2018 | 12:18 PM EDT

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.)
(YouTube)

Commenting on former CIA Director John Brennan's claim that President Trump's press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin was "treasonous," Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) noted that Brennan "started his illustrious career by voting for the Communist Party," and he has been "bad news from the very beginning."

Senator Paul also said he wondered why Brennan is "getting a government pension if he is going to be disrespecting the commander-in-chief, calling the president treasonous," which is a death penalty offense. 

On Tucker Carlson Tonight, July 18, host Tucker Carlson noted Brennan's "treasonous" claims and that President Trump has described Brennan as a "very bad guy." 

Carlson then asked Senator Paul, "So, the former director of the CIA, you think of that as a sober-minded person, a responsible person, kind of a James Bond with maybe an advanced degree -- here you have a naked partisan nut-cake describing a press conference as treason. How should that make us feel as American citizens?"

Sen. Paul said, "It makes me wonder whether he should be getting a government pension if he is going to be disrespecting the commander-in-chief, calling the president treasonous. That's about as overtop as you can imagine."

Carlson then interjected, "But treason is a death penalty offense. He is describing views he disagrees with.... Is disagreeing with someone's opinion the same as betraying the country?"

John Brennan, the CIA director in the Obama administration. (YouTube)

Paul replied, "Well, you have to realize John Brennan started his illustrious career by voting for the Communist Party. That's who he wanted to win the presidency back in the 70s. So, he voted for the Communist Party."

"When he came to be head of the CIA, I filibustered him," said Paul, "because I thought he was bad news from the very beginning. And I think what you've seen is and what should worry us all is this was one of the most powerful people in the world who has the ability to destroy anybody in the world and gain information on anything you do, any American, any foreigner, the head of the CIA."

Soviet Communist dictator Josef Stalin. (YouTube)

"And yet, with all of that power, he was coming to work each day with a bias and a hatred of the president," said Paul.  "It should worry us all. What others things could he possibly have been doing with that power? So, I'm a big believer that we need more checks and balances on those in the intelligence community. James Comey, John Brennan, James Clapper."

On July 16, Brennan, who was CIA director under President Barack Obama, tweeted, "Donald Trump's press conference performance in Helsinki rises to & exceeds the threshold of 'high crimes & misdemeanors.' It was nothing short of treasonous. Not only were Trump's comments imbecilic, he is wholly in the pocket of Putin. Republican Patriots: Where are you???"

Brennan was CIA director from March 8, 2013 to January 20, 2017.  Prior to that he was the Homeland Security Advisor, 2009-2013. Brennan is 62, married, and has no children. 

In 1976, when Democrat Jimmy Carter was running against Republican Gerald Ford, Brennan voted for the Communist Party (CPUSA) presidential candidate Gus Hall. The CPUSA was founded in 1919 and received extensive funding over the years from the Communist Soviet Union. It was always loyal to the USSR, a totalitarian regime responsible for more than 25 million deaths.

During the Hitler-Stalin Pact 1939-41, the CPUSA supported the Soviet Union and the genocidal dictator Joseph Stalin, who enslaved Eastern Europe in 1945. When Brennan voted for the Communist Party, Eastern Europe was still brutally controlled by the USSR. The Soviets did not leave Eastern Europe until 1989-91. 

(Twitter)

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Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman