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Rev. Graham: End the Muslim Call to Prayer Policy at Duke University

Michael W. Chapman
By Michael W. Chapman | January 14, 2015 | 4:15 PM EST

Donors and alumni of the prestigious Duke University in Durham, N.C.,  a school founded by Quakers and Methodists, should “withhold their support” until Duke reverses its new policy allowing the Muslim Call to Prayer on Fridays, said Rev. Franklin Graham, son of world renowned pastor Billy Graham.

Rev. Franklin Graham, head of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association. (AP)

“Duke University announced today that they will have a Muslim call to prayer from their Chapel bell tower every Friday,” said Rev. Graham on his Facebook page on Jan. 14.

“As Christianity is being excluded from the public square and followers of Islam are raping, butchering, and beheading Christians, Jews, and anyone who doesn’t submit to their Sharia Islamic law, Duke is promoting this in the name of religious pluralism,” he said.

“I call on the donors and alumni to withhold their support from Duke until this policy is reversed,” added Rev. Graham, who lives in Boone, N.C., and is the president of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association (BGEA).

Muslims praying in a mosque. (AP)

Duke University’s Christy Lohr Sapp, the chapel’s associate dean, said the policy was being introduced to show “larger commitment to religious pluralism that is at the heart of Duke’s mission," reported WRAL.com in Durham, N.C.

The Muslim chaplain at Duke, Imam Adeel Zeb, said, "The collective Muslim community is truly grateful and excited about Duke’s intentionality toward religious and cultural diversity.”

Duke University, a private college, was founded by Methodists and Quakers in 1838 and grew early on through the financial support of the highly successful businessmen and respected Methodists Julian Carr and Washington Duke.

The chapel at Duke University in Durham, N.C.

Reverend Graham has often spoken about the dangers of radical Islam.

On Fox’s Greta Van Susteren on May 5, 2010, Rev. Graham said, “First of all, Greta, I said Islam, after 9/11, I said that Islam was wicked and evil. I don't believe that Mohammed can lead anybody to God. I believe Jesus Christ is the way, the truth, and life.”

“I don't like what Muslims do to women,” he said.  “This is a big issue for me, is how they treat women. This to me is just hard what they do.”

“[Y]ou have to look at the religion and what they teach,” Rev. Graham continued.  “What the Qur'an actually teaches. It says you cannot take a Christian to be your friend, you cannot take a Jew to be your friend.  And Greta, if you were a Muslim and wanted to convert to Christianity or Judaism, if you did not repent and turn back to Islam, your family would kill you.”

Last Wednesday, Jan. 7, radical Muslims killed 12 people at the editorial offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo because the publication had printed many times over the years, cartoons of Muhammed, who Muslims consider to be a prophet.

Charlie Hebdo has also been very critical of Catholicism and the Pope, other Christian denominations, and has regularly skewered political figures in France and abroad.


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Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman