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‘Subsidizing Our Own Demise': Levin and Prof Slam Public Funding of Leftist Universities

By Lucy Collins | November 30, 2020 | 1:27pm EST
Mark Levin speaks with University of California Santa Cruz professor emeritus John Ellis. (Photo credit: YouTube/TheSlow Play)
Mark Levin speaks with University of California Santa Cruz professor emeritus John Ellis. (Photo credit: YouTube/TheSlow Play)

(CNS News) -- Conservative host Mark Levin spoke to University of California Santa Cruz professor emeritus John Ellis about “subsidizing our own demise from within” academia, referencing taxpayer funding of left-wing academia on a rerun of “Life, Liberty, and Levin” on Sunday.

“We seem to be subsidizing our own demise from within here.” Levin told Ellis on the show that originally ran on June 21. “Whether it's our federal and state tax dollars going into these schools, whether it's parents paying tuition or even other people paying tuition, and you send your kids into these schools and many of them come out quite differently ideologically. Why do we keep doing this?”

"Part of the problem is that old habits die hard," Ellis replied. "I mean, the parents have a very fixed attitude, derived from the past, that sending their kids to college is a first-rate way to launch them into a life and a career. And then there's the fact that those great names of the institutions of higher learning—Harvard, Yale, Columbia...it casts a kind of spell over the public...they really cannot believe...that what was so glorious is now in fact no longer that."

Below is a transcript of the segment.

Mark Levin: Professor Ellis, before the break, I was talking about, we seem to be subsidizing our own demise from within here. Whether it's our federal and state tax dollars going into these schools, whether it's parents paying tuition or even other people paying tuition, and you send your kids into these schools and many of them come out quite differently ideologically. Why do we keep doing this and is there something else we can do about it?

John Ellis: Well, you're right. I mean, part of the problem is that old habits die hard. I mean, the parents have a very fixed attitude, derived from the past, that sending their kids to college is a first-rate way to launch them into a life and a career. And then there's the fact that those great names of the institutions of higher learning—Harvard, Yale, Columbia—the magnificent buildings. Right, it's everything, it's very impressive -- it casts a kind of spell over the public; they really cannot believe at bottom that what was so glorious is now in fact no longer that. 

Now, there are some signs though that the public is changing its attitude. There was a study done of the total number of kids in higher education nine years ago, 2011, there were 20 and a half million students in higher education; today, that number is down to 17 and a half million. But if you adjust for the increase in population, actually there should have been a gain from 20 and a half to 21.5 million. So, there are four million students missing. So, it is true that the public is becoming more skeptical but the simple outline of the situation is this: that parents through tuition, students through the indebtedness they get through a life in college, donors, and then state legislatures all contribute vast sums of money between them to higher education and they're not getting it. What's happening instead is that a large amount of that, not all of it by any means, but a good chunk of that money, the majority of it, is an involuntary campaign contribution to the radical left. 

Now, the public has to wake up and realize that it is paying lots of money to support something it doesn't want to support and the state legislatures need to get busy on, you know, looking very seriously at whether the appropriations that they make for the purpose of funding higher education, whether they're really supporting higher education or not.

Lucy Collins is a CNSNews intern and a student at Columbia University.

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