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Pelosi: ‘The Epidemic of Police Brutality Continues’

By Craig Bannister | February 25, 2021 | 3:36pm EST
 
 
House Speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi
(Screenshot)

“The epidemic of police brutality continues – with more police killings occurring last year,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) claimed on Wednesday, even though the number of Blacks and Hispanics killed by police shootings declined from 2019.

Pelosi suggested that the number killed by police is a measure of police brutality in a statement announcing that Democrats have reintroduced a bill named after George Floyd, who died while in police custody:

“Sadly, despite mass protests across America and a renewed focus on the crisis of racial injustice, the epidemic of police brutality continues – with more police killings occurring last year than in the year before, and with communities of color and vulnerable groups disproportionately bearing the brunt of this cruelty.  We must act decisively and urgently to end the injustice.”

Five more people were fatally shot by police in 2020 than in 2019, according to data analysis by the research firm Statistica, which reports the death toll rose from 999 to 1,004.

But, the number of Blacks shot to death by police fell from 235 to 226, while the number of Hispanics fatally shot dipped from 158 to 156.

Meanwhile, the number of Whites killed by police gunfire jumped 16.7%, from 370 in 2019 to 532 in 2020.

Statistic: Number of people shot to death by the police in the United States from 2017 to 2021, by race | Statista
Find more statistics at Statista

Nonetheless, Pelosi repeated the charge of “systemic racism” to justify passage of her bill:

“The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act will address systemic racism, curb police brutality and save lives.  This legislation includes bold reforms, which ban chokeholds, stop no-knock warrants, end the court-created qualified immunity doctrine, combat racial profiling, and establish strong new standards and protections to prevent and combat police misconduct.”

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