Trump: 'A Government Shutdown Will Be Devastating to Our Military'

By Susan Jones | January 18, 2018 | 10:26 AM EST

(Photo: Screen grab/C-SPAN)

(CNSNews.com) - "A government shutdown will be devastating to our military...something the Dems care very little about!" President Trump tweeted on Thursday morning, hours before Republicans planned bring a stop-gap continuing resolution to the House floor for a vote.

In a second tweet, the President said funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) "should be part of a long-term solution, not a 30 Day, or short term, extension!" Republicans added a six-year CHIP reauthorization to the CR in hopes of attracting enough votes to pass the short-term funding bill.

Many Democrats plan to vote against the CR unless it contains a DACA deal. And some conservative Republicans say they will vote against a continuing resolution, even though it might produce a pause in some government operations -- a "shutdown," as some call it.

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, told CNN Wednesday night that he's a no vote:  

"Here's what I want," Jordan said. "I want us to do what we told the American people we were going to do, what they elected us to do. Fund defense, hold the line on non-defense, and do what the election was about on immigration. Build the border security wall, end the Visa lottery, end chain migration.

"Then if the Democrats want to shut down the government because they want to give amnesty to people who came here illegally, then you can have them on your show and they can explain why that's the appropriate thing to do. I don't think it is. That's what this is about and that's what we in the Freedom Caucus are pushing for.

Jordan said Congress can deal with the DACA issue later. He noted that the "election wasn't so much about DACA," but it was "definitely" about border security.

Jordan said those issues were "front and center, particularly in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin, states that put Donald Trump in the White House."

"There's no hard deadline now for the DACA individuals," Jordan added. The program is currently scheduled to end on March 5.

Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio) told CNN's "New Day" he's "probably" a no vote on a continuing resolution, which would fund the government at current levels.

"I don't want to shut the government down," Davidson said, noting that U.S. troops are "waiting for funding." But Davidson said a one-month continuing resolution "does not get the funding to our troops."

Davidson, also a member of the House Freedom Caucus, said he wants to vote on a "clean" full-year funding bill, "not some half-measure" that prioritizes 800,000 people whose parents brought them here illegally."

There's time later to work out a DACA deal, Davidson said. "We allegedly have an agreement on defense spending. Why can't we have a clean vote on defense spending?" he asked.

Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), the chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" on Thursday that he's "fed up with just one short-term answer after another."

"We've got to continue to fund our military men and women and not hold them hostage," Meadows said. "The additional aspect of that is that we can't grow the size of the government more than we're growing the size of people's paycheck back home. Right now, what's being contemplated is a 13 percent increase in the growth of government, and that's just unacceptable."

Meadows said he spoke by phone with President Trump last night, and "he does not want a shutdown -- he made that very clear."  However, Meadows admitted, "We still don't the votes here in the House" to pass a stop-gap CR. "We made good progress last night, hopefully we'll get there today, but it's critically important we make some decisions and start running the government like you would your household or a business. Long-term planning makes for good solutions."

Meadows said President Trump wants a separate solution on DACA, in addition to funding for the border wall and a merit-based immigration system.

"Well, at the end of the day, I do believe that DACA recipients will be protected provided we have those other three parameters that the president has laid out on border security and chain migration and visa lottery. There is a real growing consensus that we can get there, and I know I've talked to more Democrats and moderate Republicans in the last 72 hours than I have in the last 72 days on this issue.  It's critically important we get it across the finish line."

Two senators, one Republican, one Democrat, told CNN Thursday morning they will vote against the one-month CR:

"I'm sick of voting for CRs," Sen. Angus King (I-Maine) told CNN's Chris Cuomo. "This is no way to govern. We haven't had a budget in 20 years on time...I think we've got to close this escape hatch, stop voting for CRs and tell the leadership they're going to have to make their deals and then we'll get it done. I'd vote for one for a few days to do the paperwork, but to kick it down the road for another month, we're not going to know anything then that we don't know now. So I'm just through taking these half steps. This is a terrible way to try to govern."

Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) told CNN he agrees with King: "That's the reason why I'm opposing the CR in its current form as well," Rounds said. "[F]or me, it's a matter of defense and it's a matter of trying to make sure that in the future the message is, let's get our work done on time. It's been 44 years since we actually had a budget act that was workable. And in the last 44 years, in only three cases have we actually got this budget and the appropriations process done on time. That's a terrible message to send. If I was in South Dakota and we were doing this kind of stuff, they would throw us out of the capitol.

King said he calls CRs "crappy resolutions."

"It's a slow motion shutdown," he said. "The damage it's doing to the military, for example, in terms of training, in terms of contracting, it costs the government more money...The problem is, the continuing resolution gives Congress an out to avoid difficult decisions. They say, oh, well things will be better in January or on February or March, and it never happens," King said.

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