House Judiciary Committee Obtains Redacted 'Key Evidence' From Mueller Investigation

By Susan Jones | June 11, 2019 | 9:44 AM EDT

Special Counsel Robert Mueller (Photo: Screen capture)

(CNSNews.com) - House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) on Monday said he was "pleased" to announce that the Justice Department has agreed to "begin complying with our committee's subpoena" by handing over Robert Mueller's "most imortant files" to the committee.

Those files are "key evidence," Nadler said -- notes and other documents that the special counsel used to determine whether President Trump or others obstructed justice or were engaged in other misconduct.

"All members of the Judiciary Committee -- Democrats and Republicans alike -- will be able to view them," Nadler announced. "These documents will allow us to perform our constitutional duties and decide how to respond to the allegations laid out against the President by the Special Counsel."

Nadler and other House Democrats are trying to build an impeachment case against the president, but they face headwinds from a public that so far appears to have no appetite for such a proceeding.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee and an outspoken Trump foe, told CNN Monday evening that getting a look at the previously redacted Mueller documents "is a first step and a very significant step forward toward presenting this case to the American people."

Blumethal said the documents will "give life and voice and face to the black and white of this report."

"And there's a parallel with Watergate," Blumenthal said. "In Watergate, only 19 percent of the American people favored impeachment before the hearings. After those Watergate hearings, more than half the American people did. So this kind of evidence production will lead to the American people seeing the movie, so to speak. They may not read the book, but they're going to see the movie."

Blumethal said it's "really important" that the American people "see and hear Mueller, his team, (former White House Counsel Don) McGahn, and as many of the other witnesses as they can do."

On Tuesday, today, the House of Representatives is expected to vote on a resolution authorizing the Judiciary Committee to enforce its subpoenas in federal court.

Although Attorney General William Barr is off the hook for now, Nadler noted that some "enforcement action" may be necessary to obtain documents and testimony in addition to what Barr has just agreed to hand over.

Judiciary Committee Democrats are particularly eager to hear from Don McGahn, who told the Special Counsel that Trump twice directed him to remove Mueller as special counsel because Trump believed Mueller had conflicts of interest.

Volume I of the Mueller report found that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election; the report identified “numerous links” between the Russian government and the Trump Campaign; but, “the investigation did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities.”

Volume II of the report lays out obstruction-of-justice evidence, but it does not reach a conclusion on whether Trump obstructed justice. “The evidence we obtained about the President’s actions and intent presents difficult issues that prevent us from conclusively determining that no criminal conduct occurred. Accordingly, while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.”

The Mueller report leaves it to Congress to impeach the president -- indeed, the report provides a "roadmap" for lawmakers on obstruction of justice. Many Democrats are determined to do just that, despite objections from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).

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