Graham: If House Impeaches Trump, 'Here Is What I'm Going to Insist Upon...'

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By Susan Jones | October 7, 2019 | 7:38 AM EDT

U.S. Capitol looms under cloudy skies. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

(CNSNews.com) - Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), as chairman of the Judiciary Committee, has subpoena power. So will he subpoena the whistleblower who complained, based on second-hand information, about President Trump's July 25 phone call with the Ukraine's newly elected president?

"Well, here is what's going to happen," Graham told "Sunday Morning Futures" with Maria Bartiromo:

 

If the whistleblower's allegations are turned into an impeachment article, it's imperative that the whistleblower be interviewed in public, under oath and cross-examined. Nobody in America goes to jail or has anything done to them without confronting their accuser.

So here is what I'm going to insist upon, that the whistleblower, one or two, whatever, they come forward, under oath, testify, so the public can judge their credibility.

If that doesn't happen in the House, I will make sure it happens in the Senate.

Bartiromo made Graham repeat what he just said: "If you see that it is only being done behind closed doors, you will subpoena the whistleblower, then?" she asked.

"Yes," Graham said. "I will use Nancy Pelosi's words. This is about the Constitution and democracy.

"The Sixth Amendment allows people to confront witnesses against them. There can be no valid inquiry unless Democrats vote. And once you vote, there can be no valid impeachment process unless the president can confront the witnesses against him.

"Who are these people? Where did they come from? Are they tied to (former Obama CIA Director John) Brennan at all? These are questions I'd like to know."

Bartiromo asked Graham when his committee will start issuing subpoenas to compel testimony from people involved in alleged FISA abuse by the FBI, which launched a counterintelligence investigation into the Trump campaign:

Graham said he will not "get ahead" of Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz, an Obama appointee, who recently completed his investigation into FISA abuse. The report is now being redacted prior to its release.

"I'm going to look at his report," Graham said. "Then I will build out on it.

“And I'm not out to get anybody. I'm trying to find out what happened. So I'm not going to issue subpoenas because people are frustrated. I'm going to call Horowitz before the committee. He's going to tell us about FISA warrant application and the counterintelligence investigation. And I will go wherever the facts take us."

But in the meantime, Graham said, "Somebody needs to look at whether or not the DNC was involved with the Ukraine. Somebody needs to look into Bidens, whether or not they violated the law. They sure as hell looked at the Trumps. Somebody needs to look at the Bidens. I want this to be done, outside of politics."

In a letter dated Oct. 2 and addressed to the prime ministers of Australia, Italy and the United Kingdom, Graham asked that they continue to cooperate with Attorney General William Barr, who is investigating the origins and extent of foreign influence in the 2016 presidential election.

Graham noted that the New York Times has described Barr’s effort as a way of advancing the president’s “personal political interests.” That’s not true, Graham wrote:

“That the Attorney General is holding meetings with your countries to aid in the Justice Department’s investigation of what happened is well within the bounds of his normal activities. He is simply doing his job.”

Graham said it appears that the FBI and intelligence community “relied on foreign intelligence as part of their efforts to investigate and monitor the 2016 presidential election.”

His letter described those efforts, including:

(1) relying on a deeply flawed dossier filled with hearsay and written by a biased, former United Kingdom intelligence officer; (2) receiving intelligence from an Italian “professor” who was directed to contact a low-level Trump campaign advisor, George Papadopoulos to gather intelligence on the campaign; and (3) accepting information from an Australian diplomat who was also directed to contact Papadopoulos and relay information obtained from Papadopoulos regarding the campaign to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

 

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