Gov. Rick Scott: 'The Most Important Thing Is to Pray for Us'

By Susan Jones | September 11, 2017 | 4:43 AM EDT

This visible image of Category 4 Hurricane Irma was taken on Sunday Sept.10, 2017 at 9:25 a.m. EDT (1325 UTC) by the NOAA GOES East satellite as its eye approached the southwestern coast of Florida. Hurricane Jose is seen (right) near the Leeward Islands. (Credits: NASA/NOAA GOES Project)

(CNSNews.com) - As Hurricane Irma roared ashore in the Florida Keys as a strong Category 4 Sunday morning, Florida Gov. Rick Scott told ABC's "This Week" his state was getting "pounded," with much more damage still to come:

With the time for preparations over, the governor asked the nation for prayers:

We're going to get this across our whole state, because it's so big. But we're also going to get the storm surge. This state has never seen a storm surge like this. I live in Naples. This is going to go up our west coast. We're going to have 10 to 15 feet above ground level of storm surge. There will be a little bit less as it goes up the coast, but you know the west coast is very, very low.


So, I ask everybody to -- the most important thing is to pray for us. We have done everything we can to be prepared.

I'm sure there is something else we could have done. I know a lot of people want to donate. If you want to do a $10 donation go to -- text disaster at 20222. And we're still asking for volunteers. We have opened over 4,000 shelters. We're going to need volunteers to help us distribute food. You can go to VolunteerFlorida.org to volunteer as the storm passes.

So we're going to just -- just pray for us.

Gov. Scott said he has talked to President Donald Trump "pretty much every day."

"He said he'll be praying for us. He's...offered every resource there is of the federal government. I tell you, whether it's what we're doing here in Tallahassee, our first responders, the federal government, we're going to make sure every person in the state is taken care of to the extent we can," Scott said.

"It's hard to do it during a storm, but as soon as that storm passes, our first responders will be out there doing everything they can to take care of every person in the state."

Gov. Scott said his biggest worry as the storm came ashore was that people didn't evacuate and they didn't understand the risk.

 


Please support CNSNews today! (a 501c3 non-profit production of the Media Research Center)

DONATE