Feinstein Uses Word ‘Registration’ in Connection With Guns

By Susan Jones | October 9, 2017 | 5:17 AM EDT

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) came close to calling for gun registration in an interview that aired on Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, interrupting her thought at the last minute. (Photo: Screen grab from NBC's "Meet the Press.")

(CNSNews.com) – Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), a long time gun control advocate, has introduced a bill to ban bump stocks, following the deadly use of such devices in last week’s Las Vegas massacre.

But in a conversation with NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Feinstein indicated that a bump-stock ban is just a small, first step. In fact, she came close to calling for gun registration:

“I do know this, that we have a Second Amendment. There's been difference over its interpretation by the court, the high court. Nonetheless, the high court has held and possession of firearms is legal under the Second Amendment,” Feinstein said.

“There is still a lot of dissent over the court's decision with respect to the Second Amendment. Be that as it may, the court has decided and Americans generally fall in line.

“So let's say, from the perspective of this decision, it is legal for an American to carry a weapon. It's legal for them to drive a car. However, they register that car. We should perhaps look--and the NRA says, you know, guns don't kill people, people kill people.

Well, cars don't kill people. People driving them kill people. And so there are a lot of things that could be done to make it safer. But every single one has been opposed by a very powerful organization, that then goes out to get any congressman or senator that votes to the contrary. That's a fact of life,” Feinstein told NBC’s Chuck Todd.

Feinstein began the interview by calling the U.S. “a gun-happy country.”

“And I think there are many of us in growing numbers that don't want a gun-happy country," she continued.

"Guns have their place. I don't have a problem if they're used properly. But what I have seen over the decades is a growth of substantial, improper use of weapons, beginning with the Texas bell tower.

"You've seen law offices, you've seen businesses, you've seen movie theaters, you've seen high schools, you've seen colleges, you've seen a primary school with first graders in it, 20 of them killed.

"And now you see a great American classic, which is country music, people by the thousands, out in a safe place, with a big hotel in the background. And somebody comes along.

"He has been legal, he's gotten his weapons legally. He has 40 weapons; he has 12 of these bump stocks. They are on the weapons. And he begins to fire a weapon that fires similar to a machine gun out of two broken hotel windows. Every American should look at those pictures and say, do we want more of this?"

Feinstein described her bump-stock bill as “one simple thing that stops the making of a semiautomatic weapon into a machine gun.”

She also told “Meet the Press,” “I'm not sure there is any set of laws that could have prevented” the Las Vegas massacre.

Many Second Amendment supporters oppose gun registration as the slippery slope to gun confiscation.


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