Sen. Graham: Without Anytime, Anywhere Inspections, Congress Will Reject Iran Deal

By Patrick Goodenough | April 19, 2015 | 10:59 PM EDT

Secretary of State John Kerry and his Iranian counterpart Mohammad Javad Zarif led their government’s delegations at the nuclear talks in Switzerland. (AP Photo, File)

(CNSNews.com) – President Obama’s framework nuclear deal with Iran “is deteriorating before our eyes,” Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said on Sunday, predicting that any final agreement that does not require “anytime, anywhere inspections” of Iranian sites will never be approved by Congress.

Graham pointed to supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei’s insistence that Iran will not allow any foreign inspectors to visit military sites. That’s despite the U.S. saying that that the Iranians had agreed to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors visiting any site, “anywhere in the country,” where nuclear activity is suspected.

Since the framework agreement was announced on April 2, the question of access to military facilities and the timing of the lifting of sanctions have emerged as major issues of dispute between the U.S. and Iran. That framework is meant to form the basis of a final agreement, to be reached by a June 30 deadline.

“Don’t think there’s a snowball chance in hell that a Congress is going to approve this framework the way it’s set up,” Graham said on Fox News Sunday. “The ayatollah's saying he gets immediate sanction relief with no intrusive inspections.”

Legislation before the Senate gives Congress the right to review a final Iran agreement and then vote to approve or disapprove the lifting of congressionally-mandated sanctions, which is central to the agreement. (A third option allows Congress to take no action.)

“I’m saying if there’s a final deal that doesn’t require anytime, anywhere inspections, that the Senate will not go along with that,” said Graham.

The South Carolina Republican, who is contemplating joining a growing field of 2016 GOP presidential contenders, said his core principles for a good deal would include “anytime, anywhere inspections of military/nonmilitary facilities” and that “you can’t lift sanctions until the behavior of Iran changes.”

Asked if he thought congressional rejection of a deal perceived as unsatisfactory would be sufficient to override a presidential veto, Graham said it would be – “because members of the Senate understand that this is the most consequential vote we will ever take and the Iranians can’t be trusted. They lie, they cheat.”

“I’ll wait and see how it looks on paper, but if you don’t have any time, anywhere inspections, forget about it,” he said. “I just don’t think any Democrat or Republican is going to agree to allow that to become binding.”

Patrick Goodenough
Patrick Goodenough
Spencer Journalism Fellow

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