Kim Jong-un's Foreign Minister Calls Trump ‘President Evil’

By Patrick Goodenough | September 24, 2017 | 6:16pm EDT
In an undated photo posted on a regime propaganda website at the weekend, Kim Jong-un visits an orchard. (Photo: DPRK Today)

(CNSNews.com) – President Trump’s  characterization of Kim Jong-un as “rocket man” only makes it all the more inevitable that North Korea’s rockets will “visit” the U.S. mainland, the regime’s foreign minister warned on Saturday.

Ri Yong-ho used the U.N. podium in New York to hit back at Trump’s strong criticism of North Korea and its provocative actions, saying it was Trump who was on a “suicide mission” and that he would bear responsibility if innocent Americans are harmed as a result.

“Due to his lacking of basic common knowledge and proper sentiment, he tried to insult the supreme dignity of my country by referring it [sic] to a rocket,” Ri said.

“By doing so, however, he committed an irreversible mistake of making our rockets’ visit to the entire U.S. mainland inevitable all the more,” he continued. “None other than Trump himself is on a suicide mission. In case innocent lives of the U.S. are lost because of this suicide attack. Trump will be held totally responsible.”

Trump from the same podium last Tuesday condemned Kim’s “reckless pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles,” said that he was on a “suicide mission,” and warned that if the U.S. was forced to defend itself or its allies, “we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.”

Ri in his speech made a point of insulting Trump personally. In a rambling sentence he mocked Trump and his achievements, both as a property developer and as president, calling it “absurd” that such a man could be responsible for America’s nuclear deterrent.

“The absurd reality that the person like Trump – a mentally deranged person full of megalomania and complacency, the person who is chastised even by American people as ‘Commander in Grief’, ‘Lyin King,’ ‘President Evil’ – is holding the seat of the U.S. president, and the dangerous reality that the gambler who grew old using threats, frauds and all other schemes to acquire a patch of land holds the nuclear button; these are what constitute the gravest threat to the international peace and security today.”

Elsewhere in his speech Ri argued for North Korea’s right to wield a nuclear weapons capability as a necessary response to  U.S. aggression and threats. He also lashed out at the U.N. Security Council for a string of resolutions imposing sanctions against North Korea.

Ri was dismissive of countries’ refusal to recognize his country as a nuclear weapons state, suggesting its accomplishments in the field speak for themselves.

“We do not need anyone’s recognition of our status as a nuclear weapon state and our capability of nuclear strike,” he said. “The ICBM marked with sacred name of the DPRK flew over the universe above the endless blue sky, the warhead of our rocket left its trace on the blue waves of the Pacific Ocean, and the tremendous explosion and vibration of the hydrogen bomb were recorded by this planet.”

Ri said the DRPK (the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, North Korea’s formal name) was a responsible nuclear weapon state that has no intention to use nuclear weapons against “countries that do not join in the U.S. military actions against the DPRK.”

But, he warned, North Korea would take “merciless preemptive action in case the U.S. and its vassal forces show any sign of conducting a kind of ‘decapitating’ operation on our headquarters or military attack against our country.”

A U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer assigned to the 37th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron prepares to take off from Andersen AFB, Guam on Sept. 23, 2017 for a mission off North Korea’s east coast. (Photo: U.S.Air Force/Staff Sgt. Joshua Smoot)

‘The president has many military options’

Reacting to Ri’s speech, Trump tweeted later in the day, “Just heard Foreign Minister of North Korea speak at U.N. If he echoes thoughts of Little Rocket Man, they won't be around much longer!”

Also on Saturday, the Pentagon announced that U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer bombers had flown a mission off North Korea’s east coast.

Pentagon spokeswoman Dana White said it was the farthest north of the Demilitarized Zone dividing the two Koreas any U.S. aircraft have flown since the turn of the century – “underscoring the seriousness with which we take DPRK’s reckless behavior.”

“This mission is a demonstration of U.S. resolve and a clear message that the president has many military options to defeat any threat,” White said. “North Korea’s weapons program is a grave threat to the Asia-Pacific region and the entire international community. We are prepared to use the full range of military capabilities to defend the U.S. homeland and our allies.”

The B-1B Lancers were escorted by U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle fighters from Okinawa, Japan. As with previous missions since July – but which remained south of the DMZ – the bombers flew to the peninsula from the Andersen Air Force Base in the U.S. territory of Guam.

Pyongyang has threatened to fire ballistic missile towards the area around Guam to “neutralize” the U.S. military presence there.

On Sunday, North Korean propaganda sites released a video clip depicting missiles striking U.S. Air Force bombers and a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier.

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