Farrakhan: ‘The Wicked Jews Want to Use Me to Break Up the Women’s Movement’

By Patrick Goodenough | February 17, 2019 | 9:10 PM EST

Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan addresses his movement’s Saviours’ Day conference in Chicago on February 17, 2019. (Screen capture: NOI)

(CNSNews.com) – Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan on Sunday spoke in defense of Women’s March national leaders who have taken flak for associating with him, and launched fresh attacks on Jews.

“The wicked Jews want to use me to break up the women’s movement,” Farrakhan said at his movement’s Saviours’ Day conference in Chicago, praising by name the national co-leaders of the Women’s March, Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour and Carmen Perez.

In a lengthy speech, Farrakhan also accused Jews of putting Jewish suffering – specifically the Nazis’ systematic extermination of six million Jews, the Holocaust – ahead of that of others because they believe “only their life is sacred.”

Farrakhan’s statements about Jews have long been provocative, but over the past year Mallory, Sarsour and Perez have been widely condemned for associating with him, threatening to fracture the movement.

Mallory was on the stage during last year’s Saviours' Day speech, when Farrakhan drew attention to her presence. In that same speech, he declared that “the powerful Jews are my enemy.”

Later in the year, Women’s March founder Teresa Shook called on the co-chairs to step down and make way for others “who can restore faith in the Movement.”

On Sunday, Farrakhan asked the audience to applaud “my poor little sister, Tamika” – who did not attend this year – and implied that critics had used him as a pretext to attack the Women’s March leaders who were shaking up America.

“Tamika, Linda Sarsour, Carmen Perez, our sister with the Me Too movement, Black Lives Matter – the women shook the world the day after President Trump was elected,” he said. (The first march was held a day after Trump’s inauguration.)

“The women organized, and all over the world women rose up and men in government got shook. Because when women rise, change is going to come,” he said. “So when they saw that Tamika had helped bring that about, they came after her.”

“The wicked Jews want to use me to break up the women’s movement,” Farrakhan said. “It ain’t about Farrakhan; it’s about women all over the world, have the power to change the world.”

In other remarks certain to stoke new controversy, Farrakhan said that Jews “think so much of themselves” that they get offended when blacks want to use the term “holocaust” to refer to the transatlantic slave trade, lynching, rapes and other abuses.

“How many of you have heard Jewish people tell you you can’t use ‘holocaust’ when you talk about black suffering? Do you know why? Because to them the suffering of six million Jews is worth seven billion human beings on our planet.”

“So when you say ‘holocaust,’ that to them is blasphemy,” he said. “That’s how cheap they think a Palestinian life, the life of the gentiles. Only their life is sacred.”

Elsewhere in his address, Farrakhan sought to link the Talmud to ills ranging from slavery to predatory lending, and from pedophilia and pornography.

Patrick Goodenough
Patrick Goodenough
Spencer Journalism Fellow

Sponsored Links