IG Report: Ex-FBI Deputy Director McCabe 'Lacked Candor, Including Under Oath'

By Michael W. Chapman | April 13, 2018 | 4:29 PM EDT

Former FBI Deputy Director
Andrew McCabe, who was fired
at the recommendation of the 
FBI's Office of Professional
Responsibility. (YouTube)

(CNSNews.com) -- The long-anicipated Department of Justice Inspector General (OIG) report on former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe was released today, and it documents that on at least four occassions McCabe "knowingly" provided "false information" -- "lacked candor" -- when speaking with internal FBI investigators and with then-FBI Director James Comey.  In three of the instances when McCabe made fasle statements he was under oath. 

The conclusion to the OIG report states, "As detailed in this report,  the OIG found that then-Deputy Director Andrew McCabe lacked candor, including under oath, on multiple occasions in connection with describing his role in connection with a disclosure to the WSJ, and that this conduct violated FBI Offense Codes 2.5 and 2.6.

"The OIG also concluded that McCabe’s disclosure of the existence of an ongoing investigation in the manner described in this report violated the FBI’s and the Department’s media policy and constituted misconduct. The OIG is issuing this report to the FBI for such action that it deems to be appropriate."

McCabe's less-than-truthful statements were made in relation to leaked information to the Wall Street Journal, for an article published on Oct. 30, 2016.

Former FBI Director James Comey, who was fired by 
President Trump in May 2017 at the recommendation
of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
(YouTube)

The OIG confirmed that McCabe had authorized FBI Special Counsel and the assistant director for Public Affairs to speak with WSJ reporter Devlin Barrett about the Bureau's investigation of the Clinton Foundation (CF). McCabe, according to the report, was trying "to rebut a narrative" that questioned his "impartiality in overseeing FBI investigations involving former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton."

In particular, McCabe wanted to rebut the idea that he had stopped the Clinton Foundation investigation "due to Department of Justice pressure," reads the OIG report. 

The report defines Offense Code 2.5 (Lack of Candor - No Oath) as “[k]nowingly providing false information when making a verbal or written statement, not under oath, to a supervisor, another Bureau employee in an authoritative position, or another governmental agency, when the employee is questioned about his conduct or the conduct of another person.”

Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath) prohibits “[k]nowingly providing false information in a verbal or written statement made under oath," states the report. 

"Under both offense codes, lack of candor is defined to include 'false statements, misrepresentations, the failure to be fully forthright, or the concealment or omission of a material fact/information,'" stated the OIG.

Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton speaking at a Clinton Foundation event. (YouTube)

The OIG's findings are as follows:

"We found that, in a conversation with then-Director Comey shortly after the WSJ article was published, McCabe lacked candor when he told Comey, or made statements that led Comey to believe, that McCabe had not authorized the disclosure and did not know who did. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.5 (Lack of Candor – No Oath)."

"We also found that on May 9, 2017, when questioned under oath by FBI agents from INSD [FBI Inspection Division], McCabe lacked candor when he told the agents that he had not authorized the disclosure to the WSJ and did not know who did. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath). (Emphasis added.)

"We further found that on July 28, 2017, when questioned under oath by the OIG in a recorded interview, McCabe lacked candor when he stated: (a) that he was not aware of Special Counsel having been authorized to speak to reporters around October 30 and (b) that, because he was not in Washington, D.C., on October 27 and 28, 2016, he was unable to say where Special Counsel was or what she was doing at that time. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath)." (Emphasis added.)

"We further found that on July 28, 2017, when questioned under oath by the OIG in a recorded interview, McCabe lacked candor when he stated: (a) that he was not aware of Special Counsel having been authorized to speak to reporters around October 30 and (b) that, because he was not in Washington, D.C., on October 27 and 28, 2016, he was unable to say where Special Counsel was or what she was doing at that time. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath). (Emphasis added.)

The OIG further found that McCabe allowed the leak to the WSJ not because it was in the "public interest," but was "in a manner designed to advance his personal interests at the expense of Department leadership...."

"We therefore concluded that McCabe’s disclosure of the existence of an ongoing investigation in this manner violated the FBI’s and the Department’s media policy and constituted misconduct," stated the OIG. 


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Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman