Blog

Salon Upset With Fracking Company's Good Deed

Michael Morris
By Michael Morris | October 9, 2014 | 11:40 AM EDT

Baker Hughes, a major drilling services company, has dyed its drill bits pink in an attempt to raise awareness for breast cancer, and Salon is just not having it.

In what Salon called “[a] horribly misguided, pinkwashing attempt at a pun,” the Baker Hughes foundation, which donated $100,000 to the Houston Race for the Cure, said that it’s “doing our ‘bit’ for the cure.”

ype="node" title="Pink Drill Bit

Seemingly upset that a fracking company is doing something humane, something that liberals contend corporations and conservatives cannot do, Salon suggests, though, admittedly does not know, that the drilling industry is the very cause of the thing that Baker Hughes is raising awareness for – breast cancer.

According to Fuel Fix, director of operations for U.S. land drill bits at Baker Hughes, Bill Debo, said this about the pink drill bits:

Our hope is from the water cooler to the rig site to the coffee shop to everywhere, someone gets this information to their spouses, their girlfriends, their daughters so we can create awareness and end this disease forever.

Salon had this to say about the “laudable intentions” of the oil drilling industry:

[D]rill bits are used, of course, to drill oil and natural gas wells, some of which are later exploited using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. We don’t know a lot about the health risks of fracking, owing to drillers’ and regulators’ drill first, ask questions later strategy, and because the industry, in many cases, protects the precise mix of chemicals used as a “trade secret.” (Baker Hughes announced last week that it will begin disclosing all of the chemicals used in its fracking operations.) Of the 190-some chemicals commonly used by the industry, we’re lacking publicly available information about the safety of about a third of them. And in August, a federal study tested urine samples in workers who monitor fracking flowback, and found that some had been exposed to “higher than recommended” levels of benzene, a known carcinogen.

While the jury is still out, regarding the alleged link between benzene levels and breast cancer, given the fact that “[e]pidemiological studies of the effects of benzene on breast cancer risk are difficult to conduct,” rest assured that Salon and other liberal sites will not miss their opportunity to bash on business and the oil industry.

Sponsored Links