Commentary

Sarah Silverman Is as Bad as Kathy Griffin

By Bill Donohue | June 1, 2017 | 3:52pm EDT
Sarah Silverman watching the television with her version of "Jesus." (Sarah Silverman Youtube Screenshot)

Kathy Griffin was not fired from CNN for simulating oral sex on Anderson Cooper, but for depicting the president beheaded. Conclusion: Violence upsets cultural elites but not obscenities. If we add anti-Christian bigotry to the list of offensive fares that elites find acceptable, we know why Silverman will get away with her latest assault.

Netflix labels Sarah Silverman’s film, "A Speck of Dust, " "irreverent." Is it merely "irreverent" to ask audience members if they would allow God to ejaculate in their mouth? What would it take for Netflix to brand this as obscene? Would Silverman have to substitute Muhammad for God—or choose Obama instead—before they objected?

God bothers Silverman. In 2007, she was depicted on her Comedy Central show having sex with God. Jesus really gets to her. In 2014, in a YouTube video, she objected to pro-life Christians, blaming the Son of God for inspiring them. That is why she called him "Jesus F***ing Christ." She also depicted Jesus masturbating her.

Silverman is obsessed with abortion. In her Netflix movie, she screams, "Abortion does kill—your whole day." Burying babies who have been killed by an abortionist upsets her, but not because of the violence: In the movie she quips, "I want to speak at those funerals."

In 2007, Silverman joked about her three abortions. But in 2014, she admitted something to Bill Maher. "And the truth is, and I don't like to admit this, I've never had an abortion and I don't know if I would." Too bad she didn't explain why.

Griffin gets canned for crossing the line, but Silverman's obscenities and bigotry are perfectly acceptable. No wonder a recent Gallup poll said that only 1 percent of Americans rated our moral values "excellent," and 77 percent said they are "getting worse." Silverman and Netflix are two reasons why.

Bill Donohue is President and CEO of the Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights, the nation's largest Catholic civil rights organization. He was awarded his Ph.D. in sociology from New York University and is the author of seven books and many articles.

DONATE

MRC Store