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Prof. Kengor on Levin: Trump’s Helsinki Comments Don’t Compare to ‘Horrific Statements’ FDR Made About Stalin

Natalia Mittelstadt
By Natalia Mittelstadt | July 18, 2018 | 3:25 PM EDT

Dr. Paul Kengor is a professor of political science at Grove City College and executive director of the college’s Center for Vision & Values. A New York Times bestselling author of over a dozen books, Kengor is also a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. (Screenshot)

Professor Paul Kengor from Grove City College, a guest on Mark Levin’s nationally syndicated radio talk show Tuesday, said that President Trump’s comments at the Helsinki press conference don’t “begin to compare to just the extraordinary, jaw-dropping, horrific statements" that then-President Franklin Delano Roosevelt  once made about Russian dictator Joseph Stalin.

“What Trump did, what Trump said—and, you know, admittedly, I didn’t like a lot of what he said there—but that doesn’t begin to compare to just the extraordinary, jaw-dropping, horrific statements that, that FDR made to Stalin and to his advisers about Stalin in meeting after meeting.”

 

 

Kengor quotes Roosevelt expressing a desire to give the Russian dictator "everything" and "ask for nothing":

"I think that if I give him everything I possibly can and ask nothing from him in return—noblesse oblige—he won’t try to annex anything, and Stalin will work with me for a world of democracy and peace."

Professor Paul Kengor’s comments came after President Trump and Vladimir Putin held a press conference in Helsinki, Finland, on Monday and after Trump, according to CNSNews.com, “clarified his comments on the intelligence community’s assessment that Russia meddled in the 2016 presidential election, saying that he agrees with their conclusion,” on Tuesday.

Below is a transcript of Professor Kengor’s remarks on Levin’s show Tuesday:

Kengor: “What Trump did, what Trump said—and, you know, admittedly, I didn’t like a lot of what he said there—but that doesn’t begin to compare to just the extraordinary, jaw-dropping, horrific statements that, that FDR made to Stalin and to his advisers about Stalin in meeting after meeting.”

Levin: “And isn’t it important to look at actions, too, professor?”

Kengor: “Yeah, it is, and in the case of FDR, I mean, he—so, look, I mean, words and actions both.  So, he was—he was warned by William Bullitt, who was his first ambassador to the Soviet Union.  And William Bullitt had actually, at one point, been so pro-communist that, I mean, the guy practically wanted to live there—in fact, did live there; but Bullitt spent a few years in the Soviet Union, and he came back—he was awakened to kind of the death stench of Stalinism—and he warned FDR. He said, he said, ‘You cannot trust Stalin.’  And FDR told him—and this is a direct quote here, Mark—he said, ‘Bill, I don’t dispute your facts or the logic of your reasoning. I just have a hunch that Stalin is not that kind of a man.’  And FDR said this of Stalin: ‘I think that if I give him everything I possibly can and ask nothing from him in return—noblesse oblige—he won’t try to annex anything, and Stalin will work with me for a world of democracy and peace.’

“So, yeah, that’s what Stalin—”

Levin: “That—that is shocking.”

Kengor: “It’s shocking.  It is. It is.”

Levin: “And you know what, Professor?  If you hadn’t quoted that, the millions of people listening to this program—including me—would not have known those exact words.  And is it not amazing you have access to that literature?  The media have millions of dollars in researchers. They have access to that literature, and they don’t care.”

Kengor: “That’s right.  And in fact, that quote from William Bullitt goes back to Life Magazine in the 1940s.  I mean, that’s been around for 70 years.  And—I mean, it’s an amazing statement. ‘If I give Stalin everything—everything—if I give him everything I possibly can and ask nothing from him in return, he won’t try to annex anything and he’ll work with me for a world of democracy and peace.’ 

“Now, Trump may have made some bad statements in Helsinki, but he didn’t say anything like that.  I mean, you know—that’s—that’s just, that’s absolutely outrageous.”

Natalia Mittelstadt
Natalia Mittelstadt
Natalia Mittelstadt

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