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Levin: US Attorney for DC Should Investigate FBI

Natalia Mittelstadt
By Natalia Mittelstadt | June 18, 2018 | 12:44 PM EDT

Nationally syndicated radio talk show host, TV host, author and American lawyer Mark Levin (Screenshot)

On his nationally syndicated radio talk show Friday, host Mark Levin called for United States Attorney of Washington, D.C. Jessie Liu to “investigate what took place at the FBI” as a result of the inspector general’s report that was released on Thursday.

“So what I’m saying is, Ms. Liu, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, should investigate what took place at the FBI,” said Mark Levin.  “She’s got a lot of leads, a virtual—you know—zillion leads, and she’s got a document that’s 600 pages in length, almost, to help give her some guidance; impanel a grand jury, and now you can use your subpoena power.”

Mark Levin’s comments came after he had given “a lot of thought” to the Inspector General’s report that was released last Thursday.

Below is a transcript of Mark Levin’s remarks on his show Friday:

“So what I’m saying is, Ms. Liu, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, should investigate what took place at the FBI.  She’s got a lot of leads, a virtual—you know—zillion leads, and she’s got a document that’s 600 pages in length almost to help give her some guidance; impanel a grand jury, and now you can use your subpoena power.

“Isn’t it amazing that we’d been debating whether or not Mueller can subpoena the president of the United States to investigate obstruction, when in fact the president has obstructed nothing? 

“And here we have case after case after case where senior FBI agents—top executives, people working for them, and so forth—were obstructing a case, for all intents and purposes, with leaks, with a phony memo, reinterpreting the statute, and all the rest. 

 

“It seems to me if Mr. Mueller can stretch the understanding of obstruction of justice, and his, his conga line of Rockettes and pom-pom boys and girls in the media can do the same, then the U.S. Attorney in Washington, D.C. would have even a stronger argument to make. That’s her jurisdiction.

“Now I’m well aware that there’s a public integrity section in the Criminal Division of the justice department, but they haven’t taken this up.  There’s no conflict if the U.S. Attorney decides to take it up, no conflict with the Public Integrity Section in the Criminal Division [indiscernible] justice. There’s no conflict with the Special Counsel because one hasn’t been appointed.  There’s no requirement that there be an absolute specific criminal statute. We know that already, thanks to Mr. Rosenstein. Although, I would argue there could well be in this case.

“I’d been giving this a lot of thought because many have said, ‘Where do we go from here?  Where do we go from here?  More congressional hearings!’ Congressional hearings will not hold people to account, and the media had been undermining congressional hearings. They’ve been undermining the men and women who have taken the lead to try and get to the bottom of this. And while I’m not opposed to it, there needs to be this parallel course. 

“Right now there’s no criminal investigation—the leadership of the FBI in the past or what the FBI had done.  And for all we know, it’s done a hell of a lot more.”


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Natalia Mittelstadt
Natalia Mittelstadt
Natalia Mittelstadt