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Female Olympian: Transgenders Should Not Be Able to Compete in Women's Sport

Michael W. Chapman
By Michael W. Chapman | March 4, 2019 | 2:32 PM EST

Former Olympic swimmer
Sharron Davies, MBE.
(Getty Images)

Following on the heels of tennis legend Martina Navratilova, who condemned the idea of transgender "women" competing against real woman as "unfair" and "insane," Olympics swimming champion Sharron Davies, MBE tweeted that such "women" with a "male sex advantage" should not be allowed to compete in women's sport.

A transgender "women" is a biological-genetic male who pretends to be a biological female, e.g., Caitlyn Jenner. 

Sharron Davies, MBE, is a former competitive swimmer for Great Britain, who won the silver medal in the individual medley at the 1980 Olympics. She also won two gold medals at the 1978 Commonwealth Games. She has worked as a sports presenter on British television for many years.

(Twitter.)

In a March 1 tweet, Davies said, "I have nothing against anyone who wishes 2be transgender. However I believe there is a fundamental difference between the binary sex u r born with & the gender u may identify as."

"To protect women’s sport those with a male sex advantage should not be able 2compete in women’s sport," tweeted Davies. 

In another tweet on March 2, she wrote, "We all have a right to our opinions & respect from others but females athletes also have a right to a level playing field #FairPlay"

Back on Feb. 17, tennis legend Martina Navratilova wrote a commentary for The Sunday Times. In part, she wrote, "[I]t is surely unfair on women who have to compete against people who, biologically, are still men. ... [F]airness should always be valued and strived for" and "unfairness introduced through human action and chemical means should be condemned and outlawed."

(Twitter.)

"I am happy to address a transgender woman in whatever form she prefers, but I would not be happy to compete against her," said Navratilova.  "It would not be fair."

Currently, the "International Olympic Committee allows trans women to compete" against real women "as long as they have been reducing their testosterone levels for 12 months," reported The Guardian. "However, Fair Play for Women believes there is little science behind the IOC’s policy and says there is a 'legacy effect of testosterone' that gives an unfair strength advantage even after the current level of the hormone is reduced."

Tennis legend Martina Navratilova. (Getty Images)

Fair Play for Women is a non-partisan, grassroots group that fights for "women's and girls' sex-based rights," and is "concerned that in the rush to reform transgender laws and policies women’s voices will not be heard or listened to."

On its website, Fair Play for Women states, "Our aim is to facilitate the much needed factual discussion about the need for sex-based policies for women and to provide policy makers with the guidance they need for evidence-based policy making that is fair for all.

"We have earned a reputation, both amongst the general public, policy makers, politicians and the media, for calm, rational, fact-checked, accurate information, statistics, and good-faith debate."

Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman
Michael W. Chapman

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