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Mark Levin on Why We Have Electoral College: Founders, Alexander Hamilton ‘Feared the Mob’

Michael Morris
By Michael Morris | April 3, 2019 | 12:49 PM EDT

Nationally syndicated radio talk show host, TV host, author and American lawyer Mark Levin (Screenshot)

On his nationally syndicated radio talk show “The Mark Levin Show” Tuesday, host Mark Levin explained why we have the Electoral College in the United States, suggesting that the Founders, and Alexander Hamilton specifically, “feared the mob,” as Hamilton explained in Federalist No. 68.

“They [the Founders] feared the mob,” explained Mark Levin. “They feared the mob. They feared that a faction, a mob could take over the government as they had in France, and that’s why, among other reasons, we have the Electoral College. And now look at the mob – the same mob, if you will, 200 and some years later.”

Mark Levin’s comments stem from numerous progressives coming “out of the woodwork to call for the end of the Electoral College in favor of a national popular vote,” according to a piece by Jarrett Stepman with the Daily Signal. Just last month, Levin similarly addressed the Electoral College, warning, “think about how balkanized” the United States would be if there were no the Electoral College, and asking, “why would a small state be part of the Union” without the Electoral College?

Below is a transcript of Mark Levin’s remarks from his show on Tuesday:

“Federalist No. 68 was written by Alexander Hamilton, and he’s a favorite of the left, I thought, as they try to pour the progressive ideology in any Founder – and he’s one of them. And he was trying to persuade the people in New York to put pressure on their representatives in Albany and in New York to support the Constitution.

“And he said, in part,

“‘THE mode of appointment of the Chief Magistrate of the United States[, meaning the president] is almost the only part of the system, of any consequence, which has escaped without severe censure, or which has received the slightest mark of approbation from its opponents. The most plausible of these, who has appeared in print, has even deigned to admit that the election of the President is pretty well guarded. I venture somewhat further, and hesitate not to affirm, that if the manner of it be not perfect, it is at least excellent. It unites in an eminent degree all the advantages, the union of which was to be wished for.’

“They feared the mob. They feared the mob. They feared that a faction, a mob could take over the government as they had in France, and that’s why, among other reasons, we have the Electoral College. And now look at the mob – the same mob, if you will, 200 and some years later.”

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