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Levin Challenges Eric Holder to Debate Necessity of Electoral College

Michael Morris
By Michael Morris | November 15, 2016 | 3:31 PM EST

Nationally syndicated radio talk show host Mark Levin (AP Photo/AJ Mast)

On his show Monday, nationally syndicated radio talk show host Mark Levin challenged former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to debate the necessity of the Electoral College.

“This shmuck. This pathetic, fool,” remarked Mark Levin. “Why don’t you invite Eric Holder on the program? Maybe he doesn’t know who I am. Let’s try that, Mr. Producer. Tell him I want to debate the Electoral College with him. Tell him I say, ‘I know I’m outgunned, that he’s a genius – he was attorney general, was deputy attorney general, was a judge – I know I’m outgunned, but please come on, if we can have a little discussion about the Electoral College, just with a dumb talk show host who doesn’t know anything.’”

Levin’s comments come after Eric Holder went on to Bill Maher’s show “Real Time” and suggested that America should abolish the Electoral College.

Below is a transcript of Levin’s comments:

Levin: “See, part of the problem is, ladies and gentlemen, most classrooms in middle school and high school, most classrooms in college and even advanced degree courses, don’t explain the Electoral College. See, we jump right over the founding and, you know, right into the progressive era.

“First I want you to hear Eric Holder on “Real Time” with Bill Maher.

“Eric Holder, who was held in contempt by congress, wants to change the House of Representatives, wants to change the Electoral College. I’m telling you, folks, they hate the Constitution. They hate it.

“Cut two, go.”

Eric Holder: “Well, I’m in the process now of writing an article that says there’s a simple solution to it. We have to just abolish the Electoral College. It’s not …”

Levin: “Hear the fools in the audience?

“‘Yay! Yay! Yay!’ ‘What is it?’ ‘I don’t know. Get rid of it.’

“And this shmuck, this pathetic, fool – why don’t you invite Eric Holder on the program. Maybe he doesn’t know who I am. Let’s try that, Mr. Producer. Tell him I want to debate the Electoral College with him.

“Tell him I say, ‘I know I’m outgunned, that he’s a genius – he was attorney general, was deputy attorney general, was a judge – I know I’m outgunned, but please come on, if we can have a little discussion about the Electoral College, just with a dumb talk show host who doesn’t know anything.’

“‘Right, everybody?

“Start from the top, please.

“Cut two, hat/tip Right Scoop, go.”

Eric Holder: “Well, I’m in the process now of writing an article that says there’s a simple solution to it. We have to just abolish the Electoral College.”

Levin: “So, the article will be what, three sentences long?

“Go ahead.”

Bill Maher: “But they’re not going to go along with that. And isn’t that a constitutional amendment?”

Eric Holder: “Requires a constitutional amendment.”

Bill Maher: “Well, that is some heavy lifting.”

Eric Holder: “But, alright. So it involves heavy lifting.”

Bill Maher: “Right.”

Eric Holder: “Let’s lift heavy.”

Bill Maher: “Let’s lift heavy.”

Eric Holder: “Let’s do it.”

Bill Maher: “You’re right.”

Mark Levin: “‘Yeah, let’s just, hey! Let’s do it! Yay! Yay!

“Now why do we have an Electoral College, ladies and gentlemen?

“Let’s go back to fifth grade.

“Sally, why do we have an Electoral College?

“‘Because the framers of the Constitution …’ No, that doesn’t work.

“Teddy. No, that’s a buddy of mine.

“Frank, why do we have an Electoral College?

“‘Because the framers of the Constitution didn’t believe in direct democracy.’

“Why?

“‘Because they believed in unalienable rights. And they were afraid that if, if, if we had a direct democracy, then everybody could vote to take your rights away.’

“Pretty good, Frank.

“Frank is a boy, and he self-identifies as a boy for those who are curious, by the way.

“Now, Frank.

“‘Yes?’

“Did we set up a republic or a democracy?

“‘A republic, if you can keep it.’

“So, what is this Electoral College, frank?

“‘Well, they assigned the number of electors to each state. They get at least three: one for each senator and, and one for a congressman. So a state like Delaware gets three Electoral Colleges.’

“You mean electoral votes?

“‘Yes. And then a state like California gets 1,007.’

“You mean 50-something?

“‘Right.’

“And why do they do that?

“‘Well they do that because if we just had a popular vote, and, and, and then people could vote all the time to take things away.’

“And why else?

“‘Because by having an Electoral College the states matter, so, so people are just campaigning in Los Angeles and New York and Houston and Chicago. So people are campaigning in where there’s actual farms that feed us, where there’s coal mines that keep us warm, where there’s oil and gasoline and stuff like that.’

“Correct, Frank.

“So in other words, the Electoral College actually keeps us as a cohesive nation, so we’re not factionalized – East Coast, West Coast, pretty much. So presidential candidates have to campaign in places like New Hampshire and North Dakota and even Montana and Nevada, not just California, California, California, New York, New York, New York.

“‘Yes, that’s right.’

“Oh. Isn’t that what would happen if we didn’t have an Electoral College?

“‘Yes.’

“So in other words, everybody should be represented in this presidential election, even rural areas and suburban areas – not just metropolitan, heavy populated areas. People who grow our crops, who grow crops and feed us, people who drill for oil and gas and make sure that we have heat and so-forth and electricity, those people get to be represented too.

“‘Exactly.’”

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