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Immigration Expert: ‘A Wall Would Stop’ Caravan Crisis from Happening

Michael Morris
By Michael Morris | October 26, 2018 | 12:42 PM EDT

A migrant caravan walking through Mexico (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Director of Policy Studies for the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) Jessica M. Vaughan was on the Fox News Channel (FNC) yesterday with Heather Childers to discuss updates on the migrant caravans making their way through parts of Central America and Mexico toward the U.S. border, suggesting that “a wall would stop” the caravan crisis from happening and further adding that “we need more barriers.”

“[I]t’s pretty obvious to most people that a wall would stop this kind of thing from happening, or at least people getting through,” stated Jessica Vaughan on Fox News. “That’s what used to be the case in California across the border from San Diego in the nearby places there. People used to gather en masse and just run across when the sun went down, and when they put in the triple fencing, people couldn’t do that anymore.”

Vaughan continued moments later in the interview, “So we need more barriers like that to prevent these kinds of things from happening.”

The immigration expert’s comments came after a reported second migrant caravan began forming in Hoduras “and is expected to follow the larger caravan of more than 7,000 from Central America towards the U.S.-Mexico border, The Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday.”

Below is a transcript of Jessica Vaughan’s remarks from her interview with Fox News on Thursday:

FNC’s Heath Childers: “Because of the large numbers, people actually are even having an issue with the term migrant caravans, saying that it’s much more than that headed towards our border. And does this increase President Trump’s chances of getting funding for the border wall that he has campaigned on since the very beginning, before he became president?”

Director of Policy Studies for CIS Jessica Vaughan: “Well, it should. It definitely should because it’s pretty obvious to most people that a wall would stop this kind of thing from happening, or at least people getting through. That’s what used to be the case in California, across the border from San Diego in the nearby places there. People used to gather en masse and just run across when the sun went down, and when they put in the triple fencing people couldn’t do that anymore. It’s one of the most controlled parts of the border that we have.

“So we need more barriers like that to prevent these kinds of things from happening.

“But this caravan is also headed for the legal port of entry, aiming to take advantage of our laws and policies that have been applied there, and so we do still need changes in the law to give the government more flexibility in dealing with people who are applying for asylum. So, that’s a different problem.”

Childers: “Not only giving, you know, our government more flexibility, also we have to talk about the kind of message that this could send to other countries.”

Vaughan: “That’s exactly right, and the message is already out. We’ve seen lots of other countries, people from places like Bangladesh, increasing the number of apprehensions in other parts along the border, especially Arizona. We’re also hearing reports now from the northern border of people from Romania, for example, hundreds of people arriving at our northern border and asking for asylum and coming in that way.

“So, the message is out to the rest of the world that if you show up at our border, you can get through by asking for asylum, and we cannot continue to send that message.”

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