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Gay Sportswriter on Mets' Daniel Murphy: 'I Disagree with His Christian Lifestyle'

By Mark Judge | October 20, 2015 | 11:38am EDT
Mets infielder Daniel Murphy (AP)

Jim Buzinski, the gay co-founder of the website Outsports.com, has written a column critical of Mets infielder Daniel Murphy. 

Murphy is a devout Christian who disagrees with what he calls "the homosexual lifestyle." In response, Buzinski wrote a piece with the following headline: "Mets star Daniel Murphy disagrees with the gay 'lifestyle,' I disagree with his Christian 'lifestyle.'" Buzinski wrote:

There is nothing wrong with being gay, as he clearly believes, so I don't respect his views, though he has a right to express them.

One more thing -- being gay is not a "lifestyle" and it's something I did not choose. In Murphy's case, though, he did choose to be a Christian and has embraced its "lifestyle." He told the Christian Broadcast Network that he did not become a Christian until he was 14 or 15. "I actually came to the Lord in a youth group trip," he said. "The Lord's spirit overcame me so much, you couldn't resist."

He also said he believes God made him a baseball player for a reason. "He’s put me fortunately on this stage -- in the greatest athletic stage in all the world for a reason. I think that reason is to be a light."

He also asked for some divine assistance in Game 5 of the National League Divisional Series when the Mets held a 3-2 lead over the Dodgers heading into the final three innings.

"There was a lot of prayer going on out there, just asking for peace and just talking to Jesus and asking for peace those last three or four innings," he told AP. As for why he has player so well in the postseason, he said: "I don't know. Sometimes the blessings come, Jesus is good..."

I did not know Jesus was a Mets fan, which would sorely disappoint Dodgers pitcher Clayton Kershaw, who is a very vocal Christian. Maybe Jesus has a skybox at Citi Field.

Unlike gay people, Murphy chose a lifestyle, and it's one that preaches that there is something wrong with who I am. I wish he had chosen a lifestyle more inclusive and less judgmental. I would certainly couldn't disagree with that.

Murphy's original comments about homosexuality were made last spring when Billy Bean, a homosexual and Major League Baseball's "ambassador of inclusion," came to the Mets training camp. In an interview at the time Murphy said the following:

I disagree with his lifestyle. I do disagree with the fact that Billy is a homosexual. That doesn't mean I can't still invest in him and get to know him. I don't think the fact that someone is a homosexual should completely shut the door on investing in them in a relational aspect. Getting to know him. That, I would say, you can still accept them but I do disagree with the lifestyle, 100 percent.

Maybe, as a Christian, that we haven't been as articulate enough in describing what our actual stance is on homosexuality," he said. "We love the people. We disagree the lifestyle. That's the way I would describe it for me. It's the same way that there are aspects of my life that I'm trying to surrender to Christ in my own life. There's a great deal of many things, like my pride. I just think that as a believer trying to articulate it in a way that says just because I disagree with the lifestyle doesn't mean I'm just never going to speak to Billy Bean every time he walks through the door. That's not love. That's not love at all.

 

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