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Carol Burnett: Modern Sitcoms ‘Sound Like They’ve Been Written by Teenage Boys in a Locker Room’

By Mark Judge | February 1, 2016 | 3:46pm EST
Carol Burnett (AP Photo)

Comedy legend Carol Burnett, who was just honored with a Screen Actors Guild Lifetime Achievement Award, was recently interviewed by the Hollywood Reporter. Asked how comedy "has changed over the years," Burnett, 82, said today's sitcoms "sound like they've been written by teenage boys in a locker room."

Her full answer:

Funny is funny. I dare anyone to look at Tim Conway and Harvey Korman doing the dentist sketch, which is more than 40 years old, and not scream with laughter. But I am kind of bored of producers saying, "It's got to be edgy." Edgy is fine — I'm not a prude by any stretch of the imagination — but what's wrong with a good ol' belly laugh? I miss that. A lot of comedy today is so fast — it's like: "Boom! Boom! Boom!" — because they think people can't pay enough attention. Barry Levinson [who wrote for The Carol Burnett Show before becoming a director] and Rudy De Luca wrote one of my favorite sketches. It was called "The Pail," and in it, Harvey [Korman] is my psychiatrist and I'm having a session with him. It takes about five or six minutes into the sketch until we got our first laugh, but it built and built and built, and the punch line was great. It's about a girl who was traumatized by a bully in the sandbox when she was 6 years old, and he stole her little pail — and it turns out the psychiatrist was the bully. It is absolutely hysterical, but it took all that time to build. Today the suits say, "It's got to be fast." So I think some of the writing isn't good anymore. Now sitcoms sound like they've been written by teenage boys in a locker room.

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