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Ken Starr: 11th Hour Allegation is ‘Profound Injustice’ to Confirmation Process

Emily Ward
By Emily Ward | September 17, 2018 | 2:50 PM EDT

Kenneth Starr (Screenshot)

Kenneth Starr said Monday that postponing the Senate confirmation vote for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh would be a “profound injustice” to the confirmation process.

“I think there is a profound injustice here, to the process – quite apart to Judge Kavanaugh and his family,” former Clinton Independent Counsel Starr said in an interview on The Laura Ingraham Show.

 

Judge Kavanaugh is facing an allegation of sexual assault from California professor and former high school acquaintance Christine Blasey Ford.

As a result, Senate Democrats are calling for a delay of the vote, which is currently scheduled for Thursday. Ford has said that she is willing to testify in public to the Judiciary Committee.

Starr questioned Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s (D-CA) decision to wait until now to bring the allegations forward.

“We have had this elaborate process. This has been in the public domain for people to come forward, and, again, why did a United States senator, Dianne Feinstein, if I understand the facts correctly, then sit on this?”

Starr expressed concerns that delaying the vote because of the last-minute allegation would undermine the entire confirmation process.

“I’m a process guy. And process is very important to the orderly operations of government. Process is important, period, not just in courts,” he said.

“We can’t just allow this process to be run totally amok,” he added.

Starr also pointed out that the explosive allegation essentially devalues the extensive work that Senate Democrats have done in evaluating Kavanaugh’s judicial opinions prior to the vote.

“Now, apparently, all that work that the Senate did – just, it doesn’t matter. It’s all about this eleventh-hour charge. So I think it’s an unfair process,” Starr said.

“There are reasons for statutes of limitations,” he added later in the interview.

Starr advised Senate Republicans to allow Ford to give her testimony, but to “stand firm” and “stay the course” with regard to the confirmation hearing.

“I would say stand firm. Let her come forward and hear her story, it can be an executive session or whatever, but I would say stay the course. It’s simply too late. It’s a process objection that I think is profoundly important to the dignity of the Senate,” he said.

He also offered his personal approval of Kavanaugh’s character.

“Brett Kavanaugh is a person of total integrity, and he’s denied it,” Starr said. “That’s good enough for me.”

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