Lee Edwards (born 1932 in Chicago, Illinois) is a distinguished fellow in conservative thought at the B. Kenneth Simon Center for American Studies at The Heritage Foundation. He is considered one of the foremost historians of the conservative movement in America, and he has published more than 15 books, including biographies of President Ronald Reagan, Senator Barry Goldwater, Attorney General Edwin Meese III and William F. Buckley, Jr. He is currently the Chairman of the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation.

My Articles

February 25, 2015, 2:19 PM EST
As I listened to the acceptance speeches at the Academy Awards, I was struck by the constant references to a long litany of human and other rights now denied. Each charge brought the black-tied, silk-gowned audience to their feet, wildly applauding and cheering.
November 7, 2014, 10:07 AM EST
Today’s world would be a far different place if the United States had not waged and won—at the cost of thousands of lives and many billions of dollars—the Cold War. That conflict established America as the leader of the free world and a global superpower and shaped U.S. military strategy, economic policy and domestic politics from the time of President Harry Truman to the present.
October 3, 2014, 3:51 PM EDT
I first visited Hong Kong in 1969 when I interviewed young Chinese “freedom swimmers” who had traversed the treacherous Hong Kong Bay—infested by sharks and patrolled by Chinese Communist gun boats—to reach the British crown colony of Hong Kong.
September 24, 2014, 5:08 PM EDT
Quite suddenly, what Poland does and doesn’t do has become crucial to the United States and the Western alliance.
September 8, 2014, 12:16 PM EDT
When it has nothing else to do, the liberal establishment will dip into its bulging bag of clichés and declare that this time, absolutely, positively, without any doubt, the conservative movement is done. And once again it becomes the duty of right-thinking analysts to stand up and firmly say, “Poppycock!”