Andrew “Art” Arthur serves as Resident Fellow in Law and Policy for the Center for Immigration Studies, a Washington, DC-based research institute that examines the impact of immigration on American society.

My Articles

April 24, 2018, 3:33 PM EDT
In an April 17, 2018 post, I detailed the findings of the Supreme Court in a decision issued on that date in Sessions v. Dimaya. In Dimaya, the Supreme Court had ruled that 18 U.S.C. § 16(b), as incorporated into the aggravated felony definition in section 101(a)(43)(F) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) was unconstitutionally vague, affirming a decision of the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.
April 18, 2018, 2:45 PM EDT
In a decision issued on April 17, 2018, the Supreme Court ruled that 18 U.S.C. § 16(b), as incorporated into the aggravated felony definition in section 101(a)(43)(F) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) was unconstitutionally vague, affirming a circuit court decision. The Court's decision will potentially have a significant effect as relates to aliens convicted of crimes that endanger the public.
January 16, 2018, 4:21 PM EST
In a report issued earlier today, the Departments of Homeland Security (DHS) and Justice (DOJ) revealed that 73 percent of those who were convicted in federal courts of international terrorism-related charges between September 11, 2001, and December 31, 2016, some 402 individuals, were foreign-born. Of that number, 254 were aliens and 148 had naturalized.
October 31, 2017, 12:08 PM EDT
In late September, headlines were declaring that, notwithstanding President Trump's strong rhetoric, the number of aliens removed from the United States in FY 2017 was going to be lower than it had been in previous years. A review of the removal statistics for the period between FY 2008 and FY 2016 helps to explain why, notwithstanding the president's additional emphasis on immigration enforcement, the number of aliens removed from the United States, at least initially, may appear to be lower.
September 13, 2017, 12:26 PM EDT
Transnational gangs are a unique and growing public safety threat in America, not only due to their members' propensity for violence and their focus on recruiting schoolchildren, but also because of their relationship with gang leaders based outside of the United States.