Gallup: 42 Million People in Latin America and Caribbean Want to Migrate to the United States

By Michael W. Chapman | March 24, 2021 | 10:43am EDT
Gallup CEO and Chairman Jim Clifton.  (Screenshot, Gallup)
Gallup CEO and Chairman Jim Clifton. (Screenshot, Gallup)

(CNS News) -- In a March 24 blog, Gallup CEO and Chairman Jim Clifton reported that 42 million adults in Latin America and the Caribbean said they would like to immigrate to the United States.

"There are 33 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Roughly 450 million adults live in the region. Gallup asked them if they would like to move to another country permanently if they could," wrote Clifton.

(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

Twenty-seven percent of those adults said "yes." That equals roughly 120 million who want to migrate somewhere.

From that group, Gallup asked them "where they would like to move."

"Of those who want to leave their country permanently, 35% -- or 42 million -- said they want to go to the United States," reported Clifton. 

(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

"Seekers of citizenship or asylum are watching to determine exactly when and how is the best time to make their move," he added. 

"In addition to finding a solution for the thousands of migrants currently at the border, let's include the bigger, harder question -- what about all of those who would like to come? What is the message to them?" wrote Clifton.

The U.S. population is approximately 330 million. 

 Members of the criminal gang Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13) are trasnsported by officers of the National Police in Tegucigalpa, on February 19, 2021, after the dismantling of an operations centre of the organisation found in the mountains of the department of Olancho, north of Honduras. (Photo by ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP via Getty Images)
Members of the criminal gang Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13) are trasnsported by officers of the National Police in Tegucigalpa, on February 19, 2021, after the dismantling of an operations centre of the organisation found in the mountains of the department of Olancho, north of Honduras. (Photo by ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP via Getty Images)

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