University Seeks Director to Collaborate With ‘Undocumented Students’

By Zenny Phuong | July 10, 2017 | 8:26 AM EDT

Santa Clara University's Mission Church. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

(CNSNews.com) – A Catholic university in California is advertising for a director of its Office of Multicultural Learning (OML) with duties that include advocating for “undocumented students” and other minority groups on campus.

In addition to assessing diversity programs and multicultural learning, the OML director at the University of Santa Clara will play a “key role in promoting an inclusive campus climate through collaborative efforts with students, staff, and faculty, including collaborating with the Undocumented Student Working Group on initiatives related to undocumented and mixed status members of the SCU community and immigration issues broadly,” according to the job description.

The director will work and meet regularly with the Undocumented Student Working Group to plan and coordinate initiatives to meet [their] needs, the university said. He or she must also provide legal consultations and lead “Knowing Your Rights” workshops.

The new director also will help provide students, faculty and staff with UndocuAlly trainings, a project launched by the University of California-Berkeley to teach about the “history, legislation and current or future realities” of undocumented immigrants.

In the “Knowledge” category, the job description says the director must understand “the Jesuit tradition of education,” as well as understand “Student Development Theory (including Racial and Ethnic Identity Development and Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Identity Development), Social Change Model of Leadership, and Critical Race Theory.”  Also, “Understanding of the undocumented student experience, immigration policy, and other relevant information.”

Although the job posting did not list benefits, it says the salary range is “3,145-$3,697” semi-monthly, which works out to $75,480 to $88,728 a year.

CNSNews.com contacted the university for comment on the listing, but did not receive a response before this story was published.

According to the College Board, “there is no federal or state law that prohibits the admission of undocumented immigrants to U.S. colleges, public or private. Federal or state laws do not require students to prove citizenship in order to enter U.S. institutions of higher education. Yet institutional policies on admitting undocumented students vary.”