Lindsey Graham: No One's Calling Me to Say,'You Were Wrong About Obamacare'

October 9, 2013 - 4:17 AM

lindsey graham

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) (AP File Photo)

(CNSNews.com) - Although Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) disagreed with conservative Republicans' decision to take a stand against Obamacare, he said on Tuesday that the law itself -- not just the enrollment process -- is deeply flawed.

"I haven't had one person call me to say, 'Senator Graham, you were wrong about Obamacare. Your criticism of the program was off base,'" Graham told Fox News's Greta Van Susteren on Tuesday.

"As a matter of fact, all of us who opposed it from the very beginning predicted that the private sector would drop coverage because it will cost too much. They would rather pay the fine than keep insurance at the company level. And a lot of people will go to part-time employment because it is just so much cheaper to the company. They've got a bottom line to meet. I haven't had one person call me and say your criticisms were wrong and here's why."

Graham noted that President Obama made three promises to Americans: "He promised you (insurance on the health exchanges) would be no more costly than a cell phone bill; as easy as signing up for Amazon; and if you liked your health care you had already, you wouldn't lose it. He's 0 for 3."

Graham said "the biggest loser" will be young people who find their health insurance costs much higher under Obamacare.

"How does this end?" the senator asked. "Democrats eventually will get tired of defending this. And before the 2014 election, if we don't screw it up as Republicans, Democrats will come to a guy like me or others and say let's see if we can delay this thing and re-do it."

Asked if Republicans are "screwing it up," Graham said, "I think we're getting in the way of the story. Shutting down the government to defund Obamacare was a tactical choice that didn't make sense to me. I didn't think the president would sign a bill defunding Obamacare at the end of the day. The idea of letting this thing kind of collapse of its own weight and be ready to fix it in a bipartisan fashion is the best strategy."