Extermination of Christians in Egypt Not Getting Enough Attention: Piers Morgan Asks, ‘Why?’

By Susan Jones | April 11, 2017 | 6:31 AM EDT

Blood stains the pews inside the St. George Church after a suicide bombing in the Nile Delta town of Tanta, Egypt, Sunday, April 9, 2017. Bombs exploded at two Coptic churches in the northern Egyptian cities of Tanta and Alexandria as worshippers were celebrating Palm Sunday, killing over 40 people and wounding scores more in assaults claimed by the Islamic State. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

(CNSNews.com) – A three-month nationwide state of emergency took effect in Egypt on Monday, following the terror attacks on two Christian churches that killed at least 44 people on Palm Sunday.

ISIS said it sent suicide bombers to the two churches, one in Alexandria and one in Tanta. The head of the Coptic Christian church, Pope Tawadros II, was inside the cathedral in Alexandria when the bomb exploded, but he was not hurt.

ISIS also bombed a Cairo church in December, killing 30 people there, and it has threatened more violence directed at Christians, saying their blood will flow “like rivers,” the Associated Press reported.

While terror attacks in Paris, Nice, London and Sweden all got “huge attention,” the ones in Egypt did not, and that’s a problem, Piers Morgan, the editor-at-large at Daily Mail.com, told Fox News’s Tucker Carlson Monday night.

“And yet, what happened in Egypt was unbelievably significant,” Morgan said. “If you look at what ISIS really stands for, what they are carrying out now in the Middle East and in Egypt in particular, is a kind of genocidal attack on Christians and Christianity. 

“They want Christianity eradicated, and they want to convert all Muslims to their crusade. They want it to be a holy war. And they want Christians gone. And I don't think that narrative is getting the attention it should get in the American media and, I have to say, in other media as well around the world.” 

Morgan pointed to last week’s suicide bombing of a subway in St. Petersburg, Russia, that killed 13 people. Press reports on Monday said eight members of “extremist cells” have been arrested in connection with that attack.

Piers Morgan said ISIS was very blunt about the St. Petersburg attack: “They made it absolutely clear, this is a war against the cross. They said that. That is what the statement said. 

“They are at war in their heads with Christianity. Not just with Christianity, they are at war with all other religions as well. But they have been signaling out in increasingly virulent terms that their real war now is against Christians and the cross.” 

Morgan, a Catholic, said he’s concerned about the pope, who is due to visit Egypt on April 28 and 29. “He would be a massive target, a massive prize for these Islamist terrorists,” Morgan said.

“They have made it very clear that he is the number one target for them in that battle against Christians. They attacked the church where the Coptic pope was actually officiating. So they have made their intentions clear. 

“Now, I think this is a huge story. This is the kind of story that ought to be dominating cable news in America. It should be dominating headlines around the world. The press in America should be full of headlines about this. This narrative, to me, is very straightforward. ISIS have declared war on Christianity. I'm not seeing that being covered enough.” 

Morgan told Carlson he works “literally 500 yards from Westminster Bridge,” where a man named Khalid Masood rammed a rented SUV into pedestrians on March 22, killing four of them, then stabbing a security guard at the gates of the British Parliament.

While people like Masood are “dangerous,” what happened in Egypt “was hugely more significant in the overall war,” Morgan said. The attack on the Egyptian churches “looks very tactical by ISIS. It looked like they sent in highly trained people to do this. 

“And it looked (like) a far more coordinated part of a much bigger plot by them to take on Christianity…But again, the coverage of St. Petersburg, the coverage of Egypt, not as high as the coverage of a handful of people being killed in Sweden and London. And I ask, simply, why?”