Sen. Mark Warner: ‘No Place In Constitution That Says Health Care’

September 4, 2009 - 2:28 PM
During a town hall meeting, Senator Mark Warner (D-Va.) said there is "no place in the Constitution" that mentions health care or education, or even gives individuals the right to own a telephone.
Fredericksburg, Va. (CNSNews.com) – During a town hall meeting at the Fredericksburg Expo Center, Senator Mark Warner (D-Va.) said there is “no place in the Constitution” that mentions health care or education, or even gives individuals the right to own a telephone.
 
“[L]isten, there is, there is no place in the Constitution that specifically says health care,” Warner said to a government high school teacher at the event, who asked him to cite the article and section of the Constitution that gives the federal government the authority to run the health care system.
 
“There’s no place in the Constitution that specifically says education,” said Warner.

Moreover, he repeated five times that the Constitution does not guarantee individuals the right to own a telephone.
 
“There is no place in the competition, in the Constitution, there is no place in the Constitution, there is no place in the Constitution, there is no place in the Constitution, there is no place in the Constitution,” he said, “that talks about you ought to have the right to get a telephone, but we have made those choices as a country over the years.”
 

 
Warner also indicated that the high school government teacher was perhaps suggesting that government-run Medicare and Medicaid should be dissolved.
 
“So I take, I take by your question, I take by your question , I take by your question that you would get rid of Medicare and Medicaid?” Warner told the teacher.  “Or would you, are you, let me make sure I understand, you’re advocating doing away with Medicare, right? Because that’s a government program. I just want to make clear that you are suggesting doing away with Medicare.”
 
Town hall attendees who were interested in asking Warner questions were given a ticket with a number that was randomly called during the question-and-answer session.
 
Below is the transcript of the exchange between Warner and the attendee:
 
Attendee: “I realize that there are a lot of people that don’t have medical care and it’s necessary for those things to change to help those. I think that a lot of people are upset, not necessarily because of medical care, though that is a huge part of it, but I think larger is what’s happening to our government. It’s being destroyed in my personal opinion. I am a government, high school government teacher and I have taught these kids the Constitution, and I would like to know specifically, article and section of the Constitution, that gives the government the right to run our health care.”
 
Sen. Warner: “So I take, I take by your question, I take by your question, I take by your question that you would get rid of Medicare and Medicaid or would you, are you, let me make sure I understand: You’re advocating doing away with Medicare, right? Because that’s a government program. I just want to make clear that you are suggesting doing away with Medicare? But one thing, listen, there is, there is no place in the Constitution that specifically says health care. There’s no place in the Constitution that specifically says education. There is no place in the competition, in the Constitution, there is no place in the Constitution, there is no place in the Constitution, there is no place in the Constitution, there is no place in the Constitution that talks about you ought to have the right to get a telephone, but we have made those choices as a country over the years.”