Poll: 51 Percent of Americans More Afraid of Government Making Health-Care Decisions than Private Insurance Companies

February 24, 2010 - 1:05 PM
In a new national telephone survey taken Feb. 21-22, 1,000 likely voters were asked: "When it comes to health care decisions, who do you fear the most: the federal government or private insurance companies?"
Obama health plan

President Barack Obama speaks to members of the National Governors Association on Monday, Feb. 22, 2010, at the White House. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

(CNSNews.com) - A new Rasmussen Reports poll finds that a majority of Americans fear the federal government making health-care decisions more than they fear private insurance companies doing so.
 
In a national telephone survey taken Feb. 21-22, 1,000 likely voters were asked: “When it comes to health care decisions, who do you fear the most: the federal government or private insurance companies?”
 
Fifty-one (51) percent said “The federal government,” 39 percent said “Private insurance companies and 10 percent said they were “Not sure.”
 
According to Rasmussen, when asked about their support for the health-care plan the president is championing, 56 percent of voters said they oppose it, while 41 percent said they favor it. Only 23 percent “Strongly Favor” the plan, while 45 percent “Strongly Oppose” it – a level unchanged since last Thanksgiving.
 
Among those who “Strongly Favor” the plan, 80 percent feared private insurance companies most when it comes to health-care decisions. But 86 percent of those who “Strongly Oppose” the health plan were more fearful of the federal government calling the shots.
 
Male voters were more fearful of the government than female voters. Whites were twice as likely as African-Americans to fear the government most.
 
Sixty-four (64) percent of Democrats had a greater fear of private insurance companies, while 77 percent of Republicans and 52 percent of voters not affiliated with either major party feared the government most when it comes to health insurance decisions.
 
The margin of error is plus-or-minus 3 percentage points with a 95 percent level of confidence.