White House Summit on Violent Extremism Opens With Muslim Prayer – No Other Faiths Represented

By Penny Starr | February 19, 2015 | 1:31 PM EST

Imam Sheikh Sa'ad Musse Roble, president of the World Peace Organization in Minneapolis, Minn. (CNSNews.com/Penny Starr)

(CNSNews.com) – A Muslim prayer was recited at the start of the second day of the White House summit on “Countering Violent Extremism,” but no other religious text was presented during the portion of the event that was open to the press.

Imam Sheikh Sa'ad Musse Roble, president of the World Peace Organization in Minneapolis, Minn., recited a “verse from the Quran” following remarks by Obama administration officials and Democratic members of Congress.

Imam Abdisalam Adam of the Islamic Civil Society of America offered a translation of the verses:

“In translation those verses of the Quran mean ‘Whoever kills a soul unless for a soul or for corruption in the land, it’s as if he has slain mankind entirely, and whoever saves one life, it’s as if he has saved mankind entirely,’” Adam said.

“Mosques serve as (sic) beacon of hope,” Adam said. “While imams’ provide moral compass for the Muslim community in navigating life.”

Adam said “religious leaders” want to have “dialogue” with the U.S. government about “issues of concern” and said that Muslim imams have spoken out against terrorism.

“The peace, safety and security of the United States are of fundamental importance to the Muslim American community, and we oppose any form or shape of violent extremism that threatens peaceful coexistence,” Adam said.

“We believe in the right of all people to live in peace and security,” Adam said. “Muslim imams have condemned and continue to denounce anyone who tries to use the religion of Islam to support terrorism.”

Roble spoke in English on behalf of his organization, asking people to “make peace.”

“Make peace in yourself, in your family, in your friends, in your neighbors, in your state, in your country and of the war because you are brothers and sisters,” Roble said. “And God bless you.”

The press has had limited access to the event, which wraps up Thursday.