Pelosi: ‘We May Not Have the Gavel, but We Have Unity’

November 13, 2012 - 3:01 PM

Nancy Pelosi

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

(CNSNews.com) – House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said Tuesday, “We may not have the gavel, but we have unity” in the House of Representatives, where the Democrats stayed in the minority with a net gain of three seats.

“We may not have the majority. We may not have the gavel, but we have unity,” Pelosi said. “And with that unity, consensus build to solve problems, to work with President Obama, we’re ready to get to work,” Pelosi said as she and Rep. Steve Israel, head of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), welcomed newly elected representatives on Capitol Hill one week after the election.

Pelsoi said Congress is “invigorated” with the additional Democrats.

“We’re so proud of Steve. Although we did win 25 seats, we didn’t net 25 seats,” Pelosi said. “And thank you Steve for your great leadership and having this invigoration.

“Our founders envisioned a House of Representatives which would be a constant reinvigoration of the Congress, because it would—we’d have to be elected every 2 years, go to the voters every 2 years,” she said. “And this year 25 percent of our caucus is brand new, quite an invigoration.”

“Here they are: the fresh recruits. Who among them will lead our nation and what other capacity as well as leaders in the House of Representatives?

“We may not have the majority. We may not have the gavel, but we have unity,” Pelosi said. “And with that unity consensus build to solve problems to work with President Obama, we’re ready to get to work.

“And aren’t we proud of President Obama and his wonderful victory? Not to get into politics,” she added.

On Nov. 6, Republicans held on to their majority in the House, where the balance of power now stands at 234 seats to the Democrats’196. The new total represents a net gain of three seats for the minority party.

Pelosi praised her caucus for its “diversity,” claiming it is the first in history with a majority of women and minorities.

The top Democrat in the House would not say if she would seek to maintain her leadership position in the 113th Congress.