At Obama State Dept., Pollster Tells Yemen TV: I Know Evangelicals are Voting ‘If I See Cars with Little Statues of Jesus’

November 8, 2012 - 3:57 PM

John Zogby at State Department

Pollster John Zogby at State Dept. briefing on voters before election. (Photo: State Dept.)

(CNSNews.com) - American pollster John Zogby seemed to mock Evangelical Christians at a briefing specifically for foreign journalists that the U.S. State Department sponsored in Washington, D.C., on election day.

“(I)f I see cars in the parking lot with little statues of Jesus and Bibles in the front seat, that means that Evangelicals are going to turn out to vote,”  Zogby, president of Zogby International, told the foreign reporters.

The comment came in response to a question from a Yemen TV reporter, who asked: “To what extent do you think the independent would play a role in shifting the results or being a turning point either for the Republicans or for the Democrats?”

Zogby replied that he was looking “very close” at independents.

“We go into this election, anywhere 13 to 15 percent of independents undecided,” he said.

“So a big question mark is: Are they actually even going to vote? But what’s made things so volatile in this race--now, volatile meaning a couple of days Romney up by two, a couple of days Obama up by two--it’s been independents shifting back and forth. That’s how volatile it is.

“But I’ll tell you this: If we see young women voting today, then President Obama wins, because 10 percent of young women are undecided. They’re probably not going to vote for Romney. The issue is they’re going to vote--if they vote or not. If they vote, they’re going to vote for Obama.

“On the other side of that, if I see cars in the parking lot with little statues of Jesus and Bibles in the front seat, that means that Evangelicals are going to turn out to vote. Understand 10 percent of Evangelicals are undecided. Ten percent are undecided, and one-third of those undecided Evangelicals say they will never vote for a Mormon. So that’s what kind of makes our lives a bit interesting here.”

According to post-election surveys released by the Faith and Freedom Coalition, the Evangelical vote increased in 2012 to a record 27 percent of the electorate