Rand Paul: '...If You Want to Marry Another Woman, That You Can Do That and Have a Contract'

By Melanie Arter | April 13, 2015 | 11:35 AM EDT

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

(CNSNews.com) – Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) told CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday that he believes “what you do in your home is your own business” when asked about his views on gay marriage.

“In New Hampshire, you said, ‘I will fight for your right to be left alone.’ I realize that you believe gay marriage is a state issue, but why do you believe just as a core principle, as a libertarian, that people should be left alone but not when it comes to their right to marry somebody they love?” CNN host Dana Bash asked Paul.

“I do believe people ought to be left alone. I don’t care who you are, what you do at home, or who your friends are, where you hang out, what kind of music you listen to. What you do in your home is your own business. That’s always been who I am. I am a leave-me-alone kind of guy,” Paul said.

“But not when it comes to marriage?” Bash asked.

“Well, no, states will end up making the decisions on these things. I think that there’s a religious connotation to marriage. I believe in the traditional religious connotation to this, but I also believe that people ought to be treated fairly under the law,” Paul said.

“I see no reason why if the marriage contract conveys certain things, that if you want to marry another woman, that you can do that and have a contract, but the thing is the religious connotation of marriage that has been going on for thousands of years, I still want to preserve that,” he said.

“You probably could have both. You could have both traditional marriage, which I believe in, and you could also have the neutrality of the law that allows people to have contracts with another,” Paul added.

During a rally in Milford, N.H., last week, Paul said, "I will fight for your right to be left alone.

"I will fight to keep the federal government out of New Hampshire, out of your home, out of your business and out of your church,” he said on April 8, one day after announcing his presidential candidacy.

After the event, Paul voiced support for Indiana’s religious freedom law during a news conference, saying, “It should be pretty obvious to people to be able to decide whether you want to participate in a wedding or not” and “what you say as it related to your expression of your religion,” according to a local TV station WMUR.