Maxine Waters Slams New N.C. Voter ID Laws: N.C. Has ‘Just Gone Crazy’

August 28, 2013 - 10:56 AM

Maxine Waters

House Judiciary Committee member Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., at an Oct. 28, 2009 hearing on Capitol Hill. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

(CNSNews.com) - During the National Urban League’s Redeem the Dream Summit on Friday, Rep. Maxine Waters said the Supreme Court’s decision in Shelby County v. Holder was a “slick, calculated dastardly decision,” and criticized North Carolina’s new voter ID laws, saying “North Carolina has just gone crazy.”

“North Carolina has just gone crazy. It has passed legislation to require certain kinds of ID, restrict early voting and to end same-day registration. The latest bill is a bill that was signed into law earlier this month by North Carolina Governor Pat McQuary,” Waters said at the summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

“This extreme law attempts to prohibit parents of college students from claiming them as dependents when they file their taxes, if the students register to vote anywhere other than their parents homes. Under the new law, those students would be required to provide only a government-issued photo,” she continued.

Last month, North Carolina approved new voting laws requiring voters to present a government issued ID, shortens the early voting period from 17 days to 10, ends same-day registration and requires any changes in voter registration to be made at least 25 days prior to an election.

“Many of the same issues we faced in the 50s and 60s remain with us today,” Waters said.

“In June, the Supreme Court and their slick, calculated, dastardly decision to keep us from voting and keep us from the voting booth was determined - as determined by the highest court of our land - the Supreme Court that we have come to understand that we cannot count on to protect our rights or to respect the Constitution that supposedly guarantees our rights, or to respect the Constitution that is supposed to be not some people but all of the people,” Waters said.

“Now we have the right-wing Republicans that are pushing restrictive voter ID legislation in states around the country that will make it more difficult for us to make our voices heard. As of August 6th, 82 restrictive voting bills have been introduced in 31 states,” she said.

In June, the Supreme Court ruled in Shelby County v. Holder that Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act was unconstitutional. Section 4 called for states that had histories of discrimination to get any new voting measure approved by the federal government.

Last month, North Carolina approved new voting laws requiring voters to present a government issued ID, shortens the early voting period from 17 days to 10, ends same-day registration and requires any changes in voter registration to be made at least 25 days prior to an election.