House Narrowly Passes Bill Designed to Influence Earth’s Climate by Restricting U.S. Industry and Imposing Costs on American Families

June 27, 2009 - 9:58 AM
The U.S. House of Representatives narrowly passed a bill yesterday that is intended to influence the Earth's climate by limiting the emission of carbon and other designated "greenhouse gases" within the United States thus imposing costs on American families.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she discussed human rights with top Chinese leaders while on a recent trip to Japan, but said she supported funding the United Nations Population Fund, which has been linked to China's family planning practices, including forced abortions. (Photo by CNSNews.com/Penny Starr.)

(CNSNews.com) - The U.S. House of Representatives narrowly passed a bill yesterday that is intended to influence the Earth’s climate by limiting the emission of carbon and other designated “greenhouse gases” within the United States thus imposing costs on American families.
 
The conservative Heritage Foundation estimates that by 2035 the bill would cut the Gross Domestic Product of the United States by $6,790 per family of four and impose $4,600 in carbon taxes per family.  The Heritage Foundation analysis countered an analysis by the Congressional Budget Office that determined that the bill would only cost $175 per household in 2020.
 
The final vote in the House was 219 to 212 with three members not voting. There are 435 seats in the House, and one seat is currently vacant.
 
Forty-four Democrats voted against the bill and eight Republicans voted for it. With the exception of one member from Illinois, all the Republicans who voted for the bill were from states on the West or East Coasts.

The bill defines carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and nitrogen trifluoride as “greenhouse gases.” It requires the government to set increasingly stringent national caps on the emission of these gases in the United States, such that by 2050 emissions will be only 17% of what they were in 2005.
 
Emissions will be rationed in “allowances” among current emitters and owners of allowances will be able to buy and sell them on a national exchange.
 
The bill has no impact on greenhouse gas emissions in China, India or anywhere outside the United States.