House Majority Leader Cantor: Obama’s Jobs Package Is Dead

October 3, 2011 - 3:09 PM
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House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) (AP Photo)

(CNSNews.com) – House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) said that President Barack Obama’s $447-billion American Jobs Act was dead, adding that Obama’s “all or nothing” approach would not work.

At a Capitol Hill briefing on Monday, a reporter asked Cantor whether the "jobs package as a package [was] dead?"

Cantor said, "yes," and shortly thereafter said, “It seems as if the president is in full campaign mode. The president continues to say ‘pass my bill in its entirety.’ As I’ve said from the outset, this all-or-nothing approach is just not acceptable.”

Cantor also questioned whether Obama had the votes for his jobs bill in the Democrat-controlled Senate, saying that the president had some “whipping” to do.

“I think – from a purely practical standpoint – the president’s got some whipping to do on his own side of the aisle,” said Cantor.  “Clearly, I think comments made by Democrats on both the House and Senate side indicated they’ve got problems with the president’s bill.”

One of those Democrats is Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), the Senate Majority Whip. Durbin told Chicago-area radio station WLS last week that there would not be “100 percent” Democratic support for the bill in the Senate.

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President Barack Obama speaks about the American Jobs Act, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011, at Fort Hayes Arts and Academic High School in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

“The oil-producing state senators don't like eliminating or reducing the subsidy for oil companies,” Durbin said. “There are some senators who are up for election who say I'm never gonna’ vote for a tax increase while I’m up for election, even on the wealthiest people. So, we're not going to have 100 percent Democratic senators.”

The Obama jobs act has been introduced in both the House and Senate, but has found no co-sponsors in either chamber and so far has gone nowhere, even in the Senate, where the bill was introduced by Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.).