Gohmert: Holder ‘Was Not Being Truthful’; Holder: ‘You Cannot Know What I Know’

May 16, 2013 - 5:10 AM
Boston Marathon Costs

Scene of carnage in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

(CNSNews.com) – Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) said Attorney General Eric Holder “was not being truthful” when he testified before the House Judiciary Committee about the investigation into the Islamic ties of the Boston marathon bombers.

Following a tense exchange between the Texas congressman and Holder on the FBI probe into Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Gohmert said Holder was either inconsistent or lying about what he knew.

The elder Tsarnaev brother, who was killed in a shootout with authorities, was questioned by the FBI in 2011 at the request of the Russian government.  He was released because he was not considered a threat.

Gohmert questioned why Tamerlan was released, given that he had attended a mosque in Cambridge, Mass. that has ties to Abdulrahman Alamoudi, who is currently serving a 23-year prison sentence on terrorism charges.  Gohmert asked Holder if the FBI had asked Tamerlan what mosque he attended, or who his favorite Islamic writer was.

Holder said that while he “did not know the specific questions asked” of Tsarnaev, he felt the FBI investigation was “thorough.”

“Because of political correctness there was not a thorough enough examination of Tamerlan to determine if this kid had been radicalized,” Gohmert told Holder.  “That is the concern I have.  On the one hand, we go after Christian groups like Billy Graham’s group, we go after Franklin Graham’s group, but then we’re hands off when it comes to possibly offending someone who has been radicalized as a terrorist.”

Holder snapped back: “I know what the FBI did, you cannot know what I know.”

Following the hearing, Gohmert told CNSNews.com that he found Holder’s answers to be “extremely unsatisfactory.”

“For him, on the one hand, with regard to the Boston bombing, to say I don’t really know what was asked and then to turn around and say he knows for sure I’m not right in what I was saying? Well, he can’t have it both ways,” Gohmert said.

“Either he knows what was asked or he doesn’t know what was asked,” Gohmert said.  “One time or the other he was inconsistent and was not being truthful.”