French, Greek, German leaders discuss Greek crisis

By the Associated Press | September 14, 2011 | 2:10 PM EDT

Burnt euro notes, burnt because they were unusable for various reasons, are displayed in the money museum of German Bundesbank in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2011, with the German word "Ungueltig" or invalid cut into them. A top lawmaker from German Chancellor Angela Merkel's junior coalition partner is defending comments by his party's leader that an "orderly insolvency" for Greece should be considered in the future if Athens cannot get its finances in order. The comments by Free Democrats leader Philipp Roesler roiled markets earlier this week. They prompted Merkel to say she saw no quick solutions to Greece's problems and caution that "everyone should very carefully weigh their words." (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece says the leaders of Greece, France and Germany have stressed during an emergency teleconference that the debt-ridden country is an "integral" part of the eurozone, and that additional austerity measures Athens announced recently will ensure the country achieves its fiscal targets.

Fears that Greece was heading rapidly towards a chaotic default — and the idea that it should potentially leave the euro and return to its own currency — have roiled markets for days, both across the 17-nation eurozone and globally.

Leaders have been seeking to calm the markets and contain the crisis. Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy discussed the issue Wednesday night.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — The leaders of Greece, France and Germany have discussed in an emergency teleconference the financial crisis that has shaken global financial markets.

Greek government spokesman Elias Mossialos is expected to issue a statement, to be transmitted on Greek state TV, about the discussion late Wednesday. No statements were expected from the French or German side.

Fears that Greece was heading rapidly towards a chaotic default have roiled markets for days, both across the 17-nation eurozone and globally. Leaders have been seeking to calm the markets and contain the crisis.