Rep. Johnson: Public Education ‘Being Dismantled’ by Charter Schools

September 3, 2013 - 3:25 PM

 

hank johnson

Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.) (CNSNews.com/Penny Starr)

(CNSNews.com) - Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.) said that public schools are "being dismantled" by charter schools.

Johnson made the comments August 23 while attending the “Voting Rights Act” event hosted by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

“We got public education being dismantled. They used to talk about school vouchers but they’ve redone it and now it’s called the charter school movement, and a lot of us have fallen for that,” Johnson said while discussing the Civil Rights Act.

“The March On Washington back in ‘63 was largely about the discrimination that African-Americans experienced,” Johnson said.

“The stated demands of the March were first the passage of meaningful civil rights legislation, the elimination of racial segregation in public schools, protection for demonstrators against police brutality.”

“What do we have looking back now at the civil rights legislation?” Johnson later added. “We have a situation where voting rights - civil rights, the most fundamental civil right - is under attack by an out-of- control, judicial activist Supreme Court."

“We’ve got public education being dismantled. They used to talk about school vouchers but they’ve redone it and now it’s called the charter school movement, and a lot of us have fallen for that.”

In May, President Barack Obama issued a proclamation recognizing National Charter School Week. “We need to equip all our students with the education and skills that put them on the path to good jobs and a bright future -- no matter where they live or what school they attend,” the proclamation says. “Charter schools play an important role in meeting that obligation.

“Many charter schools choose to locate in communities with few high-quality educational options, making them an important partner in widening the circle of opportunity for students who need it most.”

Charter schools are an alternative to traditional public schools. Private groups can submit a charter and run their own school if they receive government approval. They receive public funds based on student enrollment.