Egypt: Partial results show Islamist lead in vote

November 30, 2011 - 5:35 AM
Mideast Egypt

Election workers count ballots for the parliamentary elections in Luxor, Egypt, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011. Egypt's military rulers are taking credit for the strong turnout in the country's first parliamentary elections since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak, the head of the election commission proclaims that the turnout so far is

CAIRO (AP) — Egyptian judges overseeing counting say Islamist parties are so far leading in initial, partial results from Egypt's parliamentary elections.

Judges say the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's most powerful fundamentalist group, had the biggest share of votes so far from partial counts in the cities of Alexandria, Luxor, Port Said, Fayoum and Kafr el-Sheik, with between 30 to 70 percent of the votes counted in those places. Vote counting in the capital Cairo was still to early to show any trend.

The judges say the Nour Party, made up of ultraconservative Islamic Salafis, and an alliance of lliberal-secular parties come next. They were unable to give proportions for each faction.

The judges spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the press.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

CAIRO (AP) — An Egyptian security official says about 80 people were hurt when clashes erupted between protesters and angry street vendors at Cairo's Tahrir Square.

The violence broke out after polls closed on Tuesday night following the first two days of voting in Egypt's parliamentary elections.

The protesters, who have camped out for more than 10 days at the square demanding Egypt's military rulers step down, tried to clear the area of street vendors, who brought in thugs and hurled stones and fire balls back.

After the clashes subsided early Wednesday, the protesters lined up metal barricades and dumpsters to protect their camp.

The official says the injured were taken to hospital. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the media.